Literature & Latte

Scrivener 2.0 – Coming Soon (No, Really)

By KB, posted 13 September 2010

In my last blog post, I talked about all the things that weren’t coming in Scrivener 2.0. Now it’s time to talk about some of the goodies that are coming. Right upfront I ought to say that the focus has been very much on improving Scrivener’s existing feature-set by better integrating various aspects of the interface and making Scrivener easier and more pleasurable to use in general. I always think very carefully before adding new features – it’s impossible to please everybody because every user has something different on his or her wish list, and if you try you just end up with software that is bloated and difficult to use. So, I make no apology for concentrating on the core features rather than trying to shoehorn in features I don’t think belong. And yes, that’s my way of saying that you won’t find anything particularly whizz-bang in this list – but you should see a solid set of features that you will find useful in the endeavour for which Scrivener was designed: writing.

It’s fair to say that Scrivener 2.0 is very much a product of user feedback. Scrivener 1.0 tried to do something new in the way it integrated various established tools (and I must have done something right because there are now a number of imitators on Windows and many features have been co-opted into certain other software on the Mac, too). But because it was doing something new, and because I am hardly a design or coding genius, there were areas that could have worked together better. Since Scrivener 1.0 came out of its (two-year-) long public beta and went on sale in January 2007, user feedback and my own constant use of Scrivener have made it obvious where things could be done better. Well, you don’t want a preamble, do you? You just want me to get to the features. But that’s all I wanted to say, really: that the way I see Scrivener 2.0 is that it is Scrivener the way it should be. I hope you’ll agree.

Right, onto some of the new features. For once, I’m not going to be too verbose in this post (EDIT: It turns out I was verbose after all – sorry about that); instead I’m going to let screenshots do most of the talking. Let’s start with a general screenshot, given that Scrivener 2.0 has had a facelift:

And now, on to 10 big new changes for Scrivener 2.0.

1. Corkboard, Outliner and Edit Scrivenings

a. Integration

Although it may not seem too exciting, perhaps my personal favourite aspect of Scrivener 2.0 is the way the corkboard, outliner and Edit Scrivenings features are now fully integrated. In Scrivener 1.x, the corkboard and outliner were always available if you were viewing a single document, but only the corkboard could be used to show a multiple selection; Edit Scrivenings, meanwhile, was a mode you “dropped” into from one of the other modes, and there was no way of just clicking back out of it again… No wonder it was a source of confusion for new users. Scrivener 2.0 does away with the arbitrary differences between these modes and makes them all available from a single toolbar control:

It makes switching between modes much more fluid and transparent. If a single document is selected, you can use the control to switch between the three modes – the editor, the corkboard and the outliner; if a group is selected, you can switch between Edit Scrivenings (which is the mode whereby multiple documents are non-destructively merged into one for editing or viewing), the corkboard and the outliner, or you can deselect them all to view the underlying text of the group document (remember: folders in Scrivener are really just a special type of text document).

b. Corkboard Improvements

The corkboard has undergone several major improvements. For a start, it has its own equivalent of Edit Scrivenings: corkboard stacks. If you select multiple groups in the binder while in corkboard mode, the contents of each group will appear on the corkboard with a dividing line between each. You can choose to view this mode in regular wrap view, or as rows and columns, too:

There’s also an entirely new corkboard mode – freeform mode. In this mode, you can move cards around freely on the board:

One of the requests I get most frequently is for a way of printing index cards, and this has been added for 2.0. You can print as individual cards if your printer supports it, on Avery index card sheets, or just on regular paper using cutting guides:

c. Outliner Improvements

The outliner has also undergone a bit of an overhaul. The two main additions are the ability to sort and the ability to add custom text columns:

d. Edit Scrivenings Improvements

The term “Edit Scrivenings” isn’t really used in the interface any more in 2.0, but it is still a major feature and now operates with the same ease as the corkboard and outliner. It has a bit of a new look, with dividers rather than alternating background colours, and you can optionally show the titles for documents too:

2. Text Editing

Scrivener is primarily about writing, so it’s only natural that the main editor has received some attention for the update. For a start, I spent over a month solely on optimisations, making typing as fast as possible, given that there were some situations in 1.x where users reported typing slowdown. Scrivener 2.0 should therefore be zippy in that regard. But there are other improvements too.

a. Pages-Style Format Bar

Scrivener 1.x used the standard OS X text system rulers, which in both editors could take up extra vertical space. In Scrivener 2.0, there is a Pages-style format ribbon running along the top of the editor instead:

b. Page Layout View

In the past, I’ve always been against adding a page layout view because there really is no concept of a “page” in Scrivener. Given that the manuscript is split across multiple documents, and given that you can compile using completely different formatting to that which you use for writing, it’s unlikely that what you see on a page in Scrivener’s editor is going to be exactly what you see in the compiled manuscript. But the fact is that some writers just like to see a physical page on screen while they write, and screenwriters rely on the rule of thumb of one page equalling one minute of screen time. For these reasons, you can now switch into a page layout view for editing text:

c. Inspector Comments and Footnotes

There’s a new way of adding comments and footnotes to Scrivener 2.0. While the 1.x bubble annotations and footnotes will remain for those who prefer them (I like Scrivener 1.x’s bubble-style annotations myself), you can also add footnotes and comments as links that appear in the inspector:

(Clicking on commented text takes you to the comment or footnote in the inspector, and clicking on a comment or footnote in the inspector selects and scrolls to the text associated with it in the editor.)

3. Snapshots

Scrivener 1.x’s snapshots populated a separate floating window, which was often a source of confusion given that it did not follow the binder selection. In Scrivener 2.0, the snapshots have been moved into the inspector:

The most useful change to snapshots, though, is the new “Compare” feature. This allows you to compare the textual differences between two snapshots, or between a snapshot and the current version of the text. This allows you to see at a glance what changes have been made to the document since a particular snapshot was taken:

4. Multiple Project Notes

In Scrivener 2.0, you can have multiple project notes. These can be accessed and managed through a separate window:

The different project notes are also available in the notes pane of the inspector:

5. Full Screen Backdrop

For those who like a little more ambience while working in full screen mode, you can now choose to have a backdrop image displayed behind your text:

(And no, I didn’t borrow this feature from the lovely Ommwriter – it’s actually been sitting in our internal version of Scrivener for two years. I was quite miffed when Ommwriter beat us to the punch on this one.)

Oh, and you can also choose to have other screens blanked out while in full screen mode now, too. I’ve always been very much against this in the past, simply because I strongly believe that if you aren’t using the extra screens then they should be turned off. However, in Scrivener 2.0 you may want to have other documents open in QuickReference panels while in full screen mode, and these would work well on another blanked-out screen. Wait, what are QuickReference panels, you ask?

6. QuickReference Panels

Like QuickLook panels, but editable. (Talking of QuickLook, the QuickLook panel is available in Scrivener 2.0 on Snow Leopard for documents that Scrivener can’t display itself – you can import any file type in Scrivener 2.0.) You can now open any number of documents from your project in separate QuickReference panels:

7. Collections

Collections provide another way of organising documents in Scrivener and they can temporarily replace the binder in the sidebar. As the name suggests, Collections are just a way of storing different lists of documents. There are two types of collection: search collections, which replace Scrivener 1.x’s “Saved Search” feature and allow you to save a search so that you can easily return to it later, and arbitrary collections, which allow you to organise and arrange any documents from the project in a flat list, regardless of their position in the binder (their position in the binder remains unaffected). So, you could have a search collection containing all the scenes that are told from a certain point of view, or an arbitrary collection of documents you want to return to later, for instance – how you use them is entirely up to you. You can even compile whole collections or use them to filter the Draft documents that get compiled, so you can use them to generate different versions of your manuscript.

8. Document Templates and Custom Icons

A core aspect of Scrivener has always been that it won’t try to tell you how to organise your writing, but will instead bend to the way you wish to work. Thus it doesn’t provide a Characters or Places folder that you can’t get rid of, or character sheets and all those things that some novelists like but just as many loathe. And besides, Scrivener is used by all sorts of writers, not just writers of fiction – by academics, lawyers, technical writers and so on – so fixed folders for character sheets would severely limit Scrivener’s usefulness to whole swathes of writers. Instead, the idea has always been that if you want these things, you can add them yourself: although the Draft and Research folders are provided by default, you can easily create other top-level folders to store character information and suchlike.

Scrivener 2.0 takes project customisation a step further by providing a way for you to assign custom icons to documents and also to set up document templates in a project. Custom icons mean that you can easily set up other folders that you want in your projects and assign them meaningful icons:

(A number of default icons are provided with Scrivener, including the ones in the screenshots above.)

Document templates allow you to designate the contents of a folder in the project as being templates – that is, blueprints for other documents you wish to create. So, for instance, you could create your own character sheet and add it to the project templates folder, and the character sheet will then be available from the “Add” menu, which, if selected, will create a copy of the character sheet at the specified location:

(You may notice in the screenshot of the character sheet document above that you can choose to have an image in the inspector synopsis area if you want – if selected that image will appear on the corkboard instead of the synopsis as well.)

9. Compile

Compile (formerly “Compile Draft”) is pretty much the workhorse of Scrivener. It’s the tool that allows you to take the text you have written and structured in the Draft folder and turn it into a printed document or a file that you can take to another program. A lot of work has gone into Compile for 2.0. In its expanded, advanced state, it now has a whole raft of new and useful options which are determined by the selected compile format:

But if that seems as though it might be a little daunting to new users, in its basic (and default) state the compile sheet is very simple and just allows you to choose from a number of prebuilt compile templates:

Scrivener’s RTF export – which is the best format for exporting to Word and most other word processors – has been massively improved, as has printing from Scrivener itself. There’s even a way to generate a table of contents within Scrivener for printing and RTF. Other formats have also been added and improved.

a. EPUB Export

You can now export to the epub format directly from Scrivener, meaning that you can export your manuscript for reading on a Sony Reader, in iBooks on the iPad or for e-publishing.

Moreover, the epub export includes support for cover images (including an option for SVG covers for the more technically-minded), footnotes and structured tables of contents.

b. Improved Final Draft Support

Scrivener 2.0’s support for the Final Draft 8 FDX format is much improved over that of 1.x. When you compile a script from Scrivener to the FDX format, all of your index card synopses will become scene summaries in Final Draft, titles will appear in the Final Draft navigator, and comments and footnotes will become scene notes. You can even define sections of dialogue in Scrivener that should become dual dialogue in Final Draft. Scrivener also has a new “Import and Split” feature that can be used to split up imported text documents, and when used with FDX files it will split them up by scene and import the scene summaries as index card synopses, so round-tripping with Final Draft is much easier.

10. Syncing for iPad, iPhone and Working Externally

There’s been a minor furore over my announcement that we currently don’t have any immediate plans for an iPad version, although an iPad version isn’t ruled out altogether in the long-term (other platforms that Scrivener won’t be coming to any time soon include Google Android, Linux and Commodore 64). But even without a dedicated app, Scrivener 2.0 provides some great ways for you to take your Scrivener documents with you for editing on an iPad or iPhone.

a. Simplenote Sync

The first way of taking your notes with you on an iPad is Simplenote sync:

This just uploads any files you choose from your project to Simplenote so that you can edit them on Simplenote for iPad (or iPhone). You can also create new documents in Simplenote. When you return to your project, you just choose to sync again and have all of the changed and new documents brought back into your project.

b. External Folder Sync

The second way of taking your notes with you is “External Folder Sync”. This allows you to designate a folder on your file system to which Scrivener will export a flat list of files from the Draft in a “Draft” folder and notes from elsewhere in the project into a “Notes” folder. You can then edit these files in an external editor. You could use this as a way of allowing a collaborator to edit or revise your files in RTF format. Or, you could sync using plain text format with a folder in your Dropbox folder, and then open and edit the files in an iPad app such as Notebooks or the upcoming PlainText. When you’re back at your desk, you just sync the changes (and new documents) back to your project.

Other Stuff

So, there are some of the big new features and changes coming to 2.0. There’s lots of other stuff, too, of course – there’s very little that has remained untouched, in fact. For instance, there’s now a revision mode for using different coloured text for revising, the scriptwriting features have been significantly improved, the scratchpad can now be called up from any application with a keyboard shortcut, the layouts feature (the ability to save window and view settings, like Adobe Workspaces) has been improved, Scrivener Links have been overhauled, you can add “favourites” to your document menus, use label colours in the binder, copy as HTML or BB code for blog or forum posting and more – there’s even a character name generator tucked away in the Writing Tools menu for fiction writers.

Finally, onto the boring administrative details…

Upgrade Fee

Our policy is that all minor updates – 1.0 to 1.01, 1.01 to 1.1, 1.2 and so on – are free to registered users of the version, but major point updates – 1.x to 2.0, 2.x to 3.0 and so on – are paid for. Scrivener 2.0 therefore marks our first paid update in nearly four years. Over that period there have been eleven free updates, some of them substantial (such as the one to 1.1, which really could have been version 2.0 in itself). Other software that came after Scrivener has moved onto version 2.0 or higher long since, so I don’t feel too bad about charging for this update, especially given the huge amount of work (two years’ worth) that has gone into it. So, the update price:

If you are a registered owner of Scrivener 1.x, you will be able to update to Scrivener 2.0 for $25.

Free Update Period

We’ve naturally been asked about this one a lot recently, but here, finally, is the official answer:

If you bought Scrivener on or since 1st August 2010, you will be entitled to a free update to Scrivener 2.0.

I’ll provide more details nearer the time, as we have yet to work out the exact details of how you’ll claim your free update, so please don’t e-mail us any questions about that just yet. I’m sorry if you bought on 31st July and so just missed out, but we have to set the line somewhere and I’m afraid we can’t make any exceptions (not including those to whom we’ve promised free updates for one reason and another, obviously), although of course you don’t have to update and can continue using version 1.x for as long as you want.

New Price

Scrivener 2.0 will also be getting a little more expensive – but not by much, and it will remain one of the cheapest among its main competitors. We remain committed to providing Scrivener at a price that we think is both reasonable and that even struggling writers and students can afford. A regular licence for Scrivener will be going up a mere $5 to $45, and the academic licence to $38.25 (which, although three dollars more expensive than the old one, marks a bigger discount off the regular price, of 15% instead of 12.5%). So, to put that in context, Scrivener is still cheaper than a video game, the price of about four paperbacks, and less than a night out.

Because any current purchases of Scrivener now include a free update to Scrivener 2.0, we’ll be starting this new pricing structure from this Friday (17th September) – which means that if you aren’t already a registered user, you have three days left to buy Scrivener – and thus Scrivener 2.0 – at the old price.

System Requirements

The system requirements for Scrivener 2.0 are the same as for Scrivener 1.x – it is a Universal application and so will run on PPC or Intel machines, and it will run on any version of OS X from Tiger (10.4) upwards. There is some extra functionality on Snow Leopard, and the more recent your operating system and machine then the better Scrivener 2.0 will run, but then that’s true of any software.

Release Date

Scrivener 2.0 will be released in late October. I’ll announce the exact date nearer the time, once we’ve finished updating the documentation and squashing remaining bugs, but our plan is to have it out and in the hands of all those who are planning to participate in NaNoWriMo this November.

Keep Updated

If you want to be notified as soon as Scrivener 2.0 is released, you can sign up for the newsletter here:

http://www.literatureandlatte.com/trial.html

Alternatively, you can follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

36 Comments

  1. mickeysss
    Posted 16 September 2010 at 04:25 | Permalink

    I HAVE ONE G5 MAC ONE MACPRO AND AN IPHONE HOW DO I BUY IT FOR ALL THREE?

  2. Posted 16 September 2010 at 08:53 | Permalink

    Absolutely awesome! Looking forward to it!

  3. Posted 16 September 2010 at 09:32 | Permalink

    $25 is a bargain!

  4. Kevin
    Posted 16 September 2010 at 15:06 | Permalink

    I’m looking forward to the update and while I understand you have to draw the free update line somewhere it does feel like the line has been drawn rather short for some who will have had the app just over three months (purchased mid July) when the paid upgrade comes in, while others have had four years use. I have not even had an update to the app yet. Love your work though.

  5. Posted 19 September 2010 at 22:38 | Permalink

    Im really looking forward to this new version of scrivener. Looks like you have put a lot of time and thought into making the program even better than it already was. That in itself is an achievement.

    Congratulations on nearing the finish line and I eagerly await the release date so I can start writing with it. (if there was somewhere to line up to get a copy I’d probably be camping out now :)

    Interesting that one of the features I am most looking to trying out is your simplenote and dropbox sync. Really curious to see how it works along with the iPad. That and probably the new cork board…

    Congrats again from a big fan!

  6. Posted 20 September 2010 at 09:33 | Permalink

    good… thanks

  7. Walt D.
    Posted 21 September 2010 at 03:13 | Permalink

    I’m very pleased to see that you will continue to support PPC, as my Powerbook G4 is my dedicated writing machine. Also, I’m glad to see that there will be some level of support for the iPad; I guess I should say +1 request for an iPad app, but simply being able to edit docs for Scrivener is welcome, and the supported ways of syncing such docs will keep me from going mad, so thanks a lot.

  8. Zoe Kharpertian
    Posted 24 September 2010 at 12:42 | Permalink

    Mollys Mum here, Keith, waiting with bated breath. This is SUCH a good excuse for delaying the start of Unpublishable Novel #5. :-) I could not live without Scrivener and hope there is provision for me to pay a little extra over my upgrade cost as a measure of my undying appreciation.

    Cheers!

  9. Posted 25 September 2010 at 16:01 | Permalink

    Can’t wait to get the new version. It looks really great!

  10. Tim
    Posted 26 September 2010 at 13:37 | Permalink

    Did you change the logo? The old one was so great! Sleek and sophisticated.

  11. Gary R. Hafer
    Posted 27 September 2010 at 23:52 | Permalink

    Man, I’m salivating. Is it the end of October yet?

  12. eli brennan
    Posted 28 September 2010 at 08:23 | Permalink

    Looks perfect. WANT. I’ve been a huge fan for a good while. This makes everything better. I check every morning. Thanks a ton. Can’t wait to give you $25.

  13. groovelady
    Posted 29 September 2010 at 01:55 | Permalink

    This looks amazing! It’s the first time I wish I could pay more for something, rather than less. I have used Scrivener ever since I read about it in the NYT Magazine, and it’s been the key to every published story and article since…

  14. Bjørn A. Bojesen
    Posted 29 September 2010 at 17:02 | Permalink

    This looks absolutely amazing!

    The best thing of it all is the new freeform corkboard mode. I’ve always found it difficult to organize stories strictly sequentially, and have been trying umpteen mindmap tools to get around this obstacle. Now Scrivener itself may blow my writing block away! :-)

  15. Peter Loader
    Posted 30 September 2010 at 04:51 | Permalink

    Everything sounds great! But, the release date can’t come fast enough!

  16. Susanne
    Posted 30 September 2010 at 11:24 | Permalink

    Wonderful! I will be happy to pay the fee! Just one thing I’d like to wish: I work with Moviemagic Screenwriter, and although it is possible to import a draft, it is difficult and requires a lot of adjustments and getting rid of formatting mistakes. Would be great to have Moviemagic Screenwriter covered, too, since many of us work with it. Thanks for Scrivener!

  17. Christopher Grundke
    Posted 03 October 2010 at 01:33 | Permalink

    This update sound absolutely fantastic. Even though the current version is a pleasure to use, the updated version will still manage to improve significantly on Scrivener’s strengths. Well done!

  18. Mike Conley
    Posted 03 October 2010 at 07:02 | Permalink

    Looks thoroughly awesome, and I will be more than happy to fork over the upgrade fee. Thanks for all the hard work.

  19. Posted 03 October 2010 at 17:39 | Permalink

    Really looking forward to this update, happy the price is reasonable. My one request is that you provide us with a pdf of the manual so that we can download and print it out, having it by us on the desk as we get used to the new features. Having said that, I’ll print out your blog above, which gives most of the info, but still…a manual would be cool. Congratulations and thank you again for all your hard work in making this a great writing tool. I have used it for fiction, but the last couple of years now used it to create academic essays, prior to final exporting and formatting “elsewhere.”

    Michael

  20. Posted 04 October 2010 at 00:32 | Permalink

    I’ve used Scrivener for two novels now, and I don’t know how many magazine articles. I find it really great for Q&A-type interview stories, where I am constantly moving parts of the transcription between questions, and shifting the order of questions within the interview to make a better-flowing story. Really looking forward to 2.0 – 1.0 has paid for itself many times over.

  21. Posted 04 October 2010 at 14:55 | Permalink

    Great news. Scrivener has always been great bang-for-the-buck, and I am more than happy to pay 25 of those bucks for the upgrade to what looks like an excellent (and well-deserving of the designation) 2.0. And I’ll certainly be recommending the 1.0 Windows version to my MS-bound friends and colleagues. :)

  22. Scooter
    Posted 04 October 2010 at 15:38 | Permalink

    FANTASTIC!! I was feared I was going to have to give up Scrivener because it wouldn’t run on the iPad. I’ve been using Evernote instead, and though it works well, it is NOT substitute for Scrivener! This sounds like EXACTLY what I need.

    Keep a port open for me, I’ll be downloading on day one!!

  23. John Stryder
    Posted 04 October 2010 at 18:23 | Permalink

    Looks very promising. Scrivener works for writers, plain and simple. And kudos for putting the emphasis on making it a truly better program, instead of just more complex. (There’s probably no programming principle given more lip service and less realization.) As for the $25 upgrade fee (for current owners), this is completely reasonable.

  24. Scooter
    Posted 07 October 2010 at 14:25 | Permalink

    I only hope it comes out early enough in the month that I can be used to it before nanowrimo!

  25. Posted 09 October 2010 at 07:47 | Permalink

    I happily pay for this upgrade. I use Scrivener for everything: writing books, articles, keep track on my projects, personal data, recipes, codes. Can’t live and work without it. Thank you so much. Ann

  26. Erica
    Posted 12 October 2010 at 01:52 | Permalink

    If we already bought 1.0, will we be able to use 2.0 for this year’s NaNoWriMo, and then upgrade for cheaper if we win like last year? I’m a broke college student so I can’t afford the $25, even though I love you guys and wanna support you!

  27. Chris
    Posted 13 October 2010 at 13:00 | Permalink

    Penny in the hat: I can’t effin’ wait for 2.0. Giddy with anticipation? This guy is.

  28. Misia
    Posted 13 October 2010 at 17:17 | Permalink

    I won last year, hence I’ve got my copy just for $24.26. If I pay $25 to upgrade it, it’ll be more than those who are getting a new one for just $45… Not to talk about whoever got it at a full price. Am I missing something?

  29. Jeff
    Posted 17 October 2010 at 23:06 | Permalink

    You’re totally missing something. This is a new version, but instead of paying full price for the new version, which most programs make you do, the fine folks at L & L are offering an upgrade price for just $25. That’s a good thing, regardless of how much you paid for the original. You did, after all, get to use the original for however long you had it for. So, instead of $25 + $45, you paid $25, and now just another $25. Or, of course, you can just stick with the version you have, which you’ve already paid for.!

  30. Misia
    Posted 18 October 2010 at 06:54 | Permalink

    Wow Jeff thanks, I didn’t know I could just stick to my version. So, at the end of the day If I decide not to stick to my version I will pay 50$ instead of 45$… Still, it makes no sense to me. As I will not get a new program all together, I will only upgrade it, why can I not upgrade my old version to the new one for 20$ instead of 25$?

  31. Jeff
    Posted 21 October 2010 at 21:56 | Permalink

    Misia, for all intents and purposes, it’s a new program altogether.

  32. Diana Sparks
    Posted 25 October 2010 at 18:13 | Permalink

    At twice the price (or more) this would be an incredible deal. Keith has obviously sweated every penny he earns for new programs and upgrades, and he’s still giving it away.

    I second the request for a pdf manual. I work on a small-ish screen, so switching back and forth between program and instructions is a pain. A hard copy guide would be a perfect solution.

    Thanks, Keith, for being so responsive to your users’ input, and for making a brilliant program even better. Scrivener 2 is #1!

  33. turnkeylatex
    Posted 28 October 2010 at 06:04 | Permalink

    I’m hopeful that the new version improves upon the compile process to LaTex…especially academic papers, dissertations and such…the missing templates and complex process for getting an acceptable output is a burden. I also am a bit surprised at the complete lack of academic templates…

  34. Misia
    Posted 28 October 2010 at 20:48 | Permalink

    Tried the V.2 beta. It’s nice but not as wow as I thought, it doesn’t look that different from the version I own. There are some new features, as switching to full screen or opening the quick ref window buttons which are just under your eyes; or the name generator, but I wouldn’t like my novel to be published with names chosen by a software. A part from that, it looks almost the same…

  35. turnkeylatex
    Posted 29 October 2010 at 04:32 | Permalink

    To be honest, I’d pay $99 for Scrivener…maybe more.

  36. Misia
    Posted 29 October 2010 at 10:26 | Permalink

    turnkeylatex, if I send you the invoice, will you pay for mine too? :D

61 Trackbacks

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Euan Semple, M. P. de Sá Pereira, tobiasbuckell, Scott Valentine, Christopher_R and others. Christopher_R said: Upcoming Scrivener 2.0 looks excellent. Many improvements including ePub export and Simplenote sync. http://bit.ly/caESG4 [...]

  2. [...] announcement of the upcoming release of Scrivener 2.0 gives me a good excuse to write about my experiences with this invaluable tool for [...]

  3. [...] Mitteilung in Keiths Blog macht klar: Scrivener 1 war etwas Neues – und Scrivener 2 soll das werden, was Scrivener immer [...]

  4. [...] Scrivener 2.0 – Coming Soon (No, Really) Posted on September 14, 2010 at 3:51 am in Me Want, Tools / Software. Follow responses to this post with the comments feed. You can leave a comment or trackback from your own site. [...]

  5. By Des infos sur Scrivener 2 | davidbosman.fr on 14 September 2010 at 16:12

    [...] La nouvelle version de mon application favorite commence à doucement pointer le bout de son nez (elle devrait sortir fin octobre). Son créateur nous donne quelques infos sur les nouveautés et même si toutes ne m’intéressent pas, en lisant la liste, j’ai un peu le sentiment d’être comme un gosse un matin de Noël, avec plein de cadeaux au pied du sapin : Scrivener 2.0 – Coming Soon (No, Really). [...]

  6. [...] If you’re looking to pen your own blockbuster novel or maybe just organise your thoughts and research on a writing project, Literature and Latte’s Scrivener is a great resource. The forthcoming version 2.0 will bring even more handy features and refinements for the dedicated writer, and on Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off some of them in a lengthy blog post. [...]

  7. [...] If you’re seeking to pen The Great American Novel, Part Two or might be usually classify your thoughts as well as investigate upon the essay project, Literature as well as Latte’s Scrivener is the good resource. The stirring chronicle 2.0 will move even some-more accessible facilities as well as refinements for the dedicated writer, as well as upon Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off the little of them in the extensive blog post. [...]

  8. [...] If you’re looking to pen The Great American Novel, Part Two or maybe just organize your thoughts and research on a writing project, Literature and Latte’s Scrivener is a great resource. The forthcoming version 2.0 will bring even more handy features and refinements for the dedicated writer, and on Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off some of them in a lengthy blog post. [...]

  9. [...] If you’re looking to pen The Great American Novel, Part Two or maybe just organize your thoughts and research on a writing project, Literature and Latte’s Scrivener is a great resource. The forthcoming version 2.0 will bring even more handy features and refinements for the dedicated writer, and on Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off some of them in a lengthy blog post. [...]

  10. By Well, hello Scrivener 2.0! « The Soulmen Blog on 15 September 2010 at 06:39

    [...] over at Literature & Latte has revealed Scrivener 2.0 and… I just don’t know how to talk about it without getting misinterpreted, misquoted, [...]

  11. [...] If you’re seeking to pen The Great American Novel, Part Two or might be usually classify your thoughts as well as investigate upon the essay project, Literature as well as Latte’s Scrivener is the good resource. The stirring chronicle 2.0 will move even some-more accessible facilities as well as refinements for the dedicated writer, as well as upon Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off the little of them in the extensive blog post. [...]

  12. [...] If you’re looking to pen The Great American Novel, Part Two or maybe just organize your thoughts and research on a writing project, Literature and Latte’s Scrivener is a great resource. The forthcoming version 2.0 will bring even more handy features and refinements for the dedicated writer, and on Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off some of them in a lengthy blog post. [...]

  13. By Word wrangling « Paul Drummond: Blog on 15 September 2010 at 11:01

    [...] best things I ever bought for my Mac, hence the plug here. I’ve been keeping an eye on the developer’s blog and it looks like version 2 is almost [...]

  14. [...] für die engagierte und am Dienstag Entwickler Keith Blount zeigten sich einige von ihnen in einem langen Blog-Post [...]

  15. [...] If you’re looking to pen The Great American Novel, Part Two or maybe just organize your thoughts and research on a writing project, Literature and Latte’s Scrivener is a great resource. The forthcoming version 2.0 will bring even more handy features and refinements for the dedicated writer, and on Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off some of them in a lengthy blog post. [...]

  16. [...] If you’re looking to pen The Great American Novel, Part Two or maybe just organize your thoughts and research on a writing project, Literature and Latte’s Scrivener is a great resource. The forthcoming version 2.0 will bring even more handy features and refinements for the dedicated writer, and on Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off some of them in a lengthy blog post. [...]

  17. [...] tool?My favorite writing tool is a piece of software called Scrivener, which will be having a major new release sometime late next month, which I can’t wait for.But for the nitty gritty of outlining and [...]

  18. [...] Infos zum Update [...]

  19. [...] If you’re looking to pen The Great American Novel, Part Two or maybe just organize your thoughts and research on a writing project, Literature and Latte’s Scrivener is a great resource. The forthcoming version 2.0 will bring even more handy features and refinements for the dedicated writer, and on Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off some of them in a lengthy blog post. [...]

  20. [...] If you’re looking to pen The Great American Novel, Part Two or maybe just organize your thoughts and research on a writing project, Literature and Latte’s Scrivener is a great resource. The forthcoming version 2.0 will bring even more handy features and refinements for the dedicated writer, and on Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off some of them in a lengthy blog post. [...]

  21. [...] If you’re looking to pen The Great American Novel, Part Two or maybe just organize your thoughts and research on a writing project, Literature and Latte’s Scrivener is a great resource. The forthcoming version 2.0 will bring even more handy features and refinements for the dedicated writer, and on Tuesday developer Keith Blount showed off some of them in a lengthy blog post. [...]

  22. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  23. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  24. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  25. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  26. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  27. By Developer offers enticing look at Scrivener 2.0 on 15 September 2010 at 20:31

    [...] here to read at the source… Developer KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he's not so focused on [...]

  28. [...] in Market,Cellphones,Games,Mp3Players Developer KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he's not so focused on [...]

  29. [...] topic.Powered by WP Greet Box WordPress Plugin Developer KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he's not so focused on [...]

  30. By Developer offers enticing look at Scrivener 2.0 on 15 September 2010 at 20:33

    [...] 2010, in Senza categoria, by Megan Lavey Developer KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he's not so focused on [...]

  31. [...] offers enticing look at Scrivener 2.0 Developer KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he's not so focused on [...]

  32. By Developer offers enticing look at Scrivener 2.0 on 15 September 2010 at 21:00

    [...] Megan Lavey (RSS feed) on Sep 15th 2010 at 3:30PM Developer KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he's not so focused on [...]

  33. [...] offers enticing look at Scrivener 2.0 Developer KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he's not so focused on [...]

  34. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he's not so [...]

  35. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  36. By Scrivener Winners Announced! | TrisHusseyDotCom on 16 September 2010 at 00:26

    [...] and the update? Yeah … Keith has revealed more details:The Cellar Door » Scrivener 2.0 – Coming Soon (No, Really) and ooh this is going to be worth the update [...]

  37. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  38. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  39. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  40. By Scrivener 2–looking yummy « davidhewson.com on 16 September 2010 at 08:43

    [...] crashed, never caused me any problems. Keith, Scrivener’s creator, has now given a preview of the features of the release version when it comes out. Well worth a look – they go well beyond anything in the betas I used and will [...]

  41. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  42. By Scrivener 2.0 Is Coming Soon « Chris Routledge on 16 September 2010 at 11:04

    [...] but there were rough edges. And now, many of those edges are going to be smoothed. Scrivener 2.0, introduced on the developer’s website before its release in October, looks like a significant revision. Among other things there are [...]

  43. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  44. [...] the incredible novelist’s tool Scrivener… but the imminent arrival of version 2.0, a new blog update explaining the new version’s added features and a last chance to get Scrivener at its old, [...]

  45. [...] list, the incredible novelist’s tool Scrivener… but the imminent arrival of version 2.0, a new blog update explaining the new version’s added features and a last chance to get Scrivener at its old, [...]

  46. [...] the incredible novelist’s tool Scrivener… but the imminent arrival of version 2.0, a new blog update explaining the new version’s added features and a last chance to get Scrivener at its old, [...]

  47. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  48. By douglas.nerad » Scrivener 2.0 Coming Soon on 16 September 2010 at 23:49

    [...] stories to an employee handbook. There are two great articles describing what the new Scrivener will and won’t have. On the “will have” side is better overall integration of the [...]

  49. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  50. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  51. By Linkdump for September 17th at found_drama on 18 September 2010 at 02:04

    [...] Scrivener 2.0 – Coming Soon (No, Really) Absolutely love this app for writing. And it looks like an incredible upgrade. (tagged: Scrivener ) [...]

  52. [...] to the Literature and Latte blog for more details on the upcoming [...]

  53. [...] on the horizon, at least for the kind of writing I’d like to be able to do on an iPad, is Scrivener 2, which will allow for synch with a series of files via Dropbox. I suspect, though, that will [...]

  54. By Scrivener 2.0 y Scrivener para Windows « Tecnele on 25 September 2010 at 14:06

    [...] las principales novedades de Scrivener 2.0 resultan prometedoras para quienes ya usamos el programa, la versión de Windows era tan ansiada [...]

  55. [...] KB made a series of blog posts about what will and will not be featured in the upcoming Scrivener 2.0. What I like is that he’s not so [...]

  56. By Software Week #2b: Scrivener for Windows on 30 September 2010 at 08:22

    [...] one concerns the impending new release of the nonpareil Mac writing program Scrivener. Details here; screen shots below showing a few of its [...]

  57. By Scrivener, WriteRoom, OmniWriter on 03 October 2010 at 13:50

    [...] Sta per uscire la versione 2.0, ma già quella disponibile è veramente unica. È uno strumento per creare documenti complessi, [...]

  58. By In Praise of Scrivener – Fluid Imagination on 13 October 2010 at 12:24

    [...] In a cou­ple of weeks, Lit­er­a­ture & Latte will release a major upgrade to Scrivener, a market-upending, writ­ing appli­ca­tion they first launched back in 2005/2006. The soft­ware has received incre­men­tal improve­ments through­out the inter­ven­ing years (includ­ing one major release at ver­sion 1.5), but this is the first upgrade the com­pany feels com­fort­able charg­ing its exist­ing cus­tomers for. With all the new fea­tures and improve­ments, not to men­tion the years of devel­op­ment, the com­pany is finally releas­ing Scrivener 2.0. [...]

  59. By How I write | Pen and Ink, Camera and Keyboard on 14 October 2010 at 14:36

    [...] Word and Pages rather than highlighting mentions in a document and forcing a manual search through. Still with 2.0 coming, I can [...]

  60. [...] Mac, da gennaio, invece, una delle più grosse novità introdotte dalla casa produttrice per la versione 2.0 dell’applicazione è proprio la versione per Windows. Ma questa non è l’unica novità [...]

  61. By Gredunza Press » Scrivener on 14 February 2012 at 17:41

    [...] pretty awesome, and the designers have blog posts up explaining (in longform philosophy-style) what will and won’t be in the new version. I can’t [...]