Mac Touch Bar Request

Kn
Knightingale
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:22 pm
Platform: Mac

Tue Dec 03, 2019 8:30 pm Post

There are some great touch bar customization and support built into Scrivener that I'm really happy with. But I find that in my workflow I tend to go back and forth a lot into Compose mode. I would love it if I could put a button on the touch bar that would let me toggle into Compose mode without having to put in a keyboard shortcut or use the mousepad to click the compose icon.
Any chance this could be put in?

Thanks,
Knightingale

de
derick
Posts: 423
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 9:58 pm

Thu Dec 05, 2019 1:55 am Post

Yes I’d agree. This was one of the first things I added when I set up a custom TouchBar for Scrivener using BTT.

https://talk.macpowerusers.com/t/i-the-touchbar/4779

Kn
Knightingale
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:22 pm
Platform: Mac

Thu Dec 05, 2019 4:39 pm Post

[quote="derick"]Yes I’d agree. This was one of the first things I added when I set up a custom TouchBar for Scrivener using BTT.


I looked into doing BTT, and I think it's a great program, but I'm rather intimidated by it. I think it appears just far more complicated than I need. Is there a way to keep the usual default buttons on the Touch Bar for Scrivener, but use BTT to add a compose button? I found that I could put on a compose button without too much trouble, but then I would lose all the other usual default buttons I like to use, such as the bold/italics/underline/strikethrough button group.

Do you know if this can be done?

de
derick
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Thu Dec 05, 2019 9:43 pm Post

No you’d need to use either the custom bar or the native one. ( I made mine before Scrivener had native support. ) But it’s just one touch to toggle bars. I tend to use the custom bar for organizational tasks and the native one while writing.

The basic text stuff I still do with the keyboard predominantly (Bold, Italics etc.) - in all apps - I use the custom touch bars for infrequently used features where I tend not to remember the keystrokes.

Kn
Knightingale
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Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:22 pm
Platform: Mac

Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:54 pm Post

[quote="derick"]No you’d need to use either the custom bar or the native one. ( I made mine before Scrivener had native support. ) But it’s just one touch to toggle bars. I tend to use the custom bar for organizational tasks and the native one while writing.

Probably a good idea. Thanks for the information. I'll have to spend some time working on a BTT set up.

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AmberV
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Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:50 pm Post

BTT is a pretty powerful tool, and it doesn’t pretend otherwise, that’s for sure. :) But you can do some pretty awesome things with it, if you give it a little time. For example, here is my custom revision mode toolbar that I made with it, for Scrivener:

Image

You can make menus of bars, like how the “Styles” button works in the native toolbar, so this is only one of the custom toolbars I’ve created.

As for why we don’t have Composition Mode on it—in general we did try to avoid adding things that are already readily accessible through a number of different mechanisms. From the keyboard, Composition Mode is ⌥⌘F. If it’s something you use a lot, it’s a shortcut worth remembering. We mainly wanted to make the stuff that you may use commonly but cannot do from the keyboard, easier. So toggling synopsis in the outliner—that’s a good addition because the only way to do that otherwise is to reach for the mouse and click a tiny button in the footer bar, or change your column settings.

At any rate, BTT is great! It made the Touch Bar go from something mostly useless in most programs to something I miss having around when I’m not using the laptop. And for those programs where the native bar is uninspiring or nonexistent, you can even set it up so that BTT uses your custom buttons by default.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
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