Revision Mode on iOS?

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ighulme
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Wed Feb 13, 2019 4:02 pm Post

Thanks everyone for taking the time to reply.

I guess the only downside then is having to select the particular 'revision' style for every correction when using iOS?
I'm getting used to doing this routine, but--just to be sure--am I correct in thinking that there is no way to 'lock' the editor to a default style when editing?

Many thanks,
Ian

p.s.
Do you think in future, the revision mode could be modified to work on styles perhaps, to enable cross-platform use?
I G HULME
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AmberV
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Wed Feb 13, 2019 6:05 pm Post

There is a larger downside than that I think, and one that would make your idea of simply using styles for the official feature unwise: you can’t overlap one style over another, and revisions may at times involve edits that pass over style boundaries as well.

I don’t use the style method in projects that depend heavily upon styled text, for instance. It’s just more trouble than it is worth. In those cases I tend to use snapshot comparison mode instead, or revisions. The former can be of some use to an iOS-based workflow if you enable Take snapshots before updating documents, in the Sharing: Sync preference tab.

But that’s the complication—whatever revisions is has to be capable of overlapping styles without messing them up. Something simple like text colour does that without a large amount of code.

…am I correct in thinking that there is no way to ‘lock’ the editor to a default style when editing?


I don’t know what you mean by that in particular, but as for how I understand it, no there isn’t. Scrivener isn’t like a word processor where all text has a default style. You only have to style the text that is exceptional.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
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Silverdragon
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Wed Feb 13, 2019 8:57 pm Post

Hi, @ighulme,

AFAIK, there is no way to "lock" a style, such that you can drop a cursor into something that's styled differently (or is unstyled) and your new typing will automatically be in the "locked" style. It sounds like that's what you're asking—apologies if I've misunderstood.

As for overriding styles in the compiler, what has to happen there is that you need to redefine the styles inside your compile format. The steps for that are:

  1. Double-click on the compile format name (duplicating if needed) to open the format for editing.
  2. In the compile format editor, select the Styles panel.
  3. If needed, add or import a style with the same name as the one you want to override.
  4. Select the style you want to override.
  5. Adjust the formatting of the style to your preference, in the provided Scrivener formatting editor.

Hope this helps!
Screenshot_2019-02-13_12_41_17.jpg
Screenshot_2019-02-13_12_41_17.jpg (152.14 KiB) Viewed 1794 times
So you know where I'm coming from:
  • I write fiction.
  • I'm not an L&L employee.
  • Mac Scrivener 3.1.3, MacBook Air 11, MacOS 10.14.6 (Mojave)
  • IOS Scrivener 1.2; iPhone 8 Plus, iOS 13.1.2; iPad 6th gen, iPadOS 13.1.2

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ighulme
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Thu Feb 14, 2019 9:57 am Post

there is no way to "lock" a style, such that you can drop a cursor into something that's styled differently


Yes, that is what I meant--I didn't think it was possible, but just thought I'd make sure! :)

As for overriding styles in the compiler, what has to happen there is that you need to redefine the styles inside your compile format.


Thanks for the explanation, it's really helpful. I was getting very confused between the relationship of styles in the Text Editor, and those in the Compiler. You've cleared things up for me. :)

Many thanks,
Ian
I G HULME
The Heavenfield: http://www.heavenfield.com

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Silverdragon
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Thu Feb 14, 2019 5:42 pm Post

The compile styles thing was confusing when I first ran into it :D . Fortunately, I gave myself several days when I wasn't facing a deadline to just dive in and (re)learn it. Glad to be of help.
So you know where I'm coming from:
  • I write fiction.
  • I'm not an L&L employee.
  • Mac Scrivener 3.1.3, MacBook Air 11, MacOS 10.14.6 (Mojave)
  • IOS Scrivener 1.2; iPhone 8 Plus, iOS 13.1.2; iPad 6th gen, iPadOS 13.1.2

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ChristopherBest
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Platform: Windows

Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:28 pm Post

Hi, ighulme,

AFAIK, there is no way to "lock" a style, such that you can drop a cursor into something that's styled differently (or is unstyled) and your new typing will automatically be in the "locked" style. It sounds like that's what you're asking—apologies if I've misunderstood.

As for overriding styles in the compiler, what has to happen there is that you need to redefine the styles inside your compile format. The steps for that are:

  1. Double-click on the compile format name (duplicating if needed) to open the format for editing.
  2. In the compile format editor, select the Styles panel.
  3. If needed, add or import a style with the same name as the one you want to override.
  4. Select the style you want to override.
  5. Adjust the formatting of the style to your preference, in the provided Scrivener formatting editor.

Hope this helps!Image
Screenshot_2019-02-13_12_41_17.jpg


Thanks! It really helped!