The Lion, The Witch and The *Snore*

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Jaysen
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Mon Nov 23, 2009 4:40 pm Post

Mr X, Please note that I used the word "drivel". Being a bit of a Lewis fan (not an educated fan, just a person who likes to dream about the worlds Lewis creates instead of telling everything about that world (this is in direct opposition to the reasons I like LOTR and Wheel of Time)) In a letter to an American corespondent he stated that the books were intended to be enjoyable stories for kids. I guess I want that to be the end of his motives.
Jaysen

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africanstardust
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Thu Jan 21, 2010 6:14 pm Post

Oh. I cry. :cry: :cry: :cry: But I guess everyone is entitled to their opinions.

I would like to say one thing in response to xiamenese. While some conservative Christians do shun The Lord of the Rings, there are many (myself included) who don't. Like all religions, there is a great variety of sects. Just thought I would point that out, I don't mean to criticize or offend :)

EDIT: I was going to say more about The Chronicles of Narnia, but Jaysen sort of beat me to it.
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xiamenese
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Fri Jan 22, 2010 6:39 am Post

Jaysen and Ms Africanstardust,
I did note your use of the word "drivel", Jaysen, and took on board its import. I have never thought that all Christians of whatever denomination condemn LoTR, not even all conservative Christians, though there are definitely those that do, as Mr J so clearly points out. I still think it mystifying that one branch of Christianity can condemn it utterly and another can claim it to be not just a great work but indeed a catalyst for a renaissance in Christian literature.
Furthermore, I am sure CS Lewis would have wanted his books to be enjoyed by children, and in that he succeeded for millions. My comments about the other motivations were more an attempt to find a justification for what many, myself included, see as their short-comings. I think that most of us would be very happy if we could produce 7 books, each in a weekend — if the claims are true — books which have had the continuing success of the Narnia series.
And, of course, Ms A, I take your comments neither as criticism nor as offence.
:)
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Jaysen
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Fri Jan 22, 2010 12:43 pm Post

xiamenese wrote:I still think it mystifying that one branch of Christianity can condemn it utterly and another can claim it to be not just a great work but indeed a catalyst for a renaissance in Christian literature.

As do I. But if you think about it, it isn't that much different than the branches of the various political parties in most nations. In the US there are republicans that actually like the idea of socialized healthcare while some democrats condemn any form of healthcare reform.
Jaysen

I have a wife and 2 kids that I can only attribute to a wiggle, a giggle, and the realization that she was out of my league so I might as well be happy with her as a friend. 24 years marriage later, I can't imagine life without her. -Me 10/7/09

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xiamenese
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Fri Jan 22, 2010 12:49 pm Post

Jaysen wrote:
xiamenese wrote:I still think it mystifying that one branch of Christianity can condemn it utterly and another can claim it to be not just a great work but indeed a catalyst for a renaissance in Christian literature.

As do I. But if you think about it, it isn't that much different than the branches of the various political parties in most nations. In the US there are republicans that actually like the idea of socialized healthcare while some democrats condemn any form of healthcare reform.

True indeed ... as my grandmother — Cumberland — used to say, "Theers nowt so queer as folk!", but that was before 'queer' changed its meaning!
:)
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mary
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Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:01 pm Post

Oh, dear. Once again, I am practically alone here. I love these books, and have from the age of 6. Our whole family loves them! A couple of corrections, if you don't mind, Xiamenese:

Tolkien was Catholic, but did not convert Lewis to Catholicism. Lewis was an Ulster protestant by birth who became an atheist as a teenager and then converted to Christianity and joined the Anglican church as an adult. Tolkien was one of several friends who influenced him.

And the reason many people prefer to read LWW before the others is that this was the original order - the order of publication. According to internal Narnian Chronology, it's second, and "Magician's Nephew" which is the first story in the Narnian Chronology, was written sixth. Keith, I'd give that one a try before giving up on the series entirely. It and "Voyage of the Dawn Treader" have some of the loveliest imagery and most interesting ideas of the series. "Dawn Treader" is perhaps the best straight adventure story, and my favorite of the books. My sister likes "Horse and his Boy" best. Oh, well-

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Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:06 pm Post

Oh, just one more correction, Keith. The girl who wears makeup is the only one who is *not* killed in a train crash.Lewis kills everyone else. I suppose her survival might still be seen as a pretty harsh punishment, though.

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Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:10 pm Post

Oh, sorry. Just one more. LOTR is not, and never has been, a children's story. It was not written or intended for children, but for adults. That children can and do read it with pleasure just points out what a strong story it is, IMHO.

And now I'll stop ranting! Btu I really get upset by LOTR being lumped in with the Narnia books, which are children's stories. Apples and oranges, IMO. (And, though I love them both, there is no question in my mind that LOTR is by far the greater work.)

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GrubStLodger
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Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:50 am Post

I have never, as child or adult been able to get through the unwadeable stodge that is Lord of the RIngs and nor have I ever got through the Hobbit. There is something about the huge wads of exposition and landscape, combined with the fact that all the characters seemed liked cyphers following the dictates of a plot.

Although as a child I really enjoyed Narnia and read the whole series in a row. I would agree the characters (with the exception of Reepicheep) are largely flat and the plots slight, but I loved the whole escapist element of the whole thing. I was entranced with the notion that I could go through a cabinet or a picture and find myself some where grand and strange where animals talked and I was special.

I'd also agree that Voyage of the Dawntreader is the best of the books and it full of seasalt and curiosity.