No 1

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bobueland
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Mon Jan 10, 2011 4:37 pm Post

What is your favorite book no 1?

You are only to pick ONE SINGLE book. I know it might be hard to pick just one, but still choose just one. Not the book which is most beautiful or impressively written. Not the most rescent book that made an impression on you. But the one book which has meant more in your life than any other book.
Don't be a sissy, don't be a snob. Post a reply to Ueland Bob.

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tellnes
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Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:34 pm Post


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AmberV
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Mon Jan 10, 2011 6:04 pm Post

.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles

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Ahab
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Mon Jan 10, 2011 7:35 pm Post

The Return of the Native, Thomas Hardy

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Mon Jan 10, 2011 7:53 pm Post

Against Forgetting, Twentieth Century Poetry of Witness, edited by Carolyn Forché.

There is nothing else to which I turn so often for truth, solace, history, poetry.

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bobueland
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Mon Jan 10, 2011 7:54 pm Post

I had a real difficulty answering this question. There have been a few books that really blew my mind when I first read them. They were totally unsuspected. I could not even imagine that such books could be written. And they changed the way I started to think and evaluate situations. These books are: How to solve it. Bhagavad Gita. How to stop worrying and start living. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. The Power of Now.

But none of these is my no 1. Instead it is a book which is no mind blower at all. It is a very modest book that only says what is self evident. Yet I feel that this simple little book holds the secret of how to live a good life. The title of the book is "The Slight Edge".
Last edited by bobueland on Mon Jan 10, 2011 8:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Don't be a sissy, don't be a snob. Post a reply to Ueland Bob.

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Mon Jan 10, 2011 8:32 pm Post

A collection of stories by Alexander Solzhenitsyn, including "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich".
That's the book that got me started writing.

Franz

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Mon Jan 10, 2011 8:58 pm Post

Desert Solitaire by Edward Abbey.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desert_Solitaire

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AmberV
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Mon Jan 10, 2011 9:25 pm Post

I'm breaking the rules, but a very close second to my original choice would be The Little Prince, by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. A children's book that should be required reading for every adult. :)
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles

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Tue Jan 11, 2011 5:02 am Post

Good post Bobueland!

The Tree of Man, Patrick White

Runners-up:
Something Wicked this Way Comes, Ray Bradbury
The Unusual Life of Tristam Smith, Peter Carey
Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov

Franz: When I was a teenager One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich had a powerful effect on me, one that I came to strongly resent years later. I was an avid cross-country runner from ages 14-17, but after reading a scene where Solzhenithzyn derides athletics as an absurd frivolity of the elites, not only could I not run anymore, but I became drawn into a nihilistic outlook that took years to escape. It's a bit like that film, "Requiem for a Funeral", pushing an anti-drugs message, but so relentlessly bleak that one almost needs drugs to recover from it!

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AmberV
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Tue Jan 11, 2011 5:22 am Post

I know exactly what film you are talking about. Dream, though, not Funeral.
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Ioa Petra'ka
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geoffh
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Tue Jan 11, 2011 5:35 am Post

AmberV wrote:I know exactly what film you are talking about. Dream, though, not Funeral.


Yep, that's correct. Brilliant film-maker though Aronofsky, I loved The Wrestler.

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vic-k
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Tue Jan 11, 2011 6:01 pm Post

bobueland wrote:What is your favorite book no 1?

You are only to pick ONE SINGLE book. I know it might be hard to pick just one, but still choose just one. Not the book which is most beautiful or impressively written. Not the most rescent book that made an imp
bobueland wrote:.. which has meant more in your life than...
I'm not really sure how to interpret this, uncle bob.You seem to preclude any of my knee-jerk resposes.

I've only read one novel, that caused me to seriously consider changing the path I was desirous of my life taking, and that was, 'Lady Chatterley's Lover', by D. H. Lawrence.

In 1960, on the cusp, twixt a life enhancing education, and the seeking of gainful, revenue generating full time employment, I read LCL. Thereafter, I felt that I no longer wanted to be a train driver, or a bus driver, but a gamekeeper instead. As you would expect, with all the publicity the LCL obscenity trial generated, applications for game keeping posts, were ridiculously over subscribe to. I became an apprentice panel beater instead.

Nothing I'd read prior, or since, has had that kind of impact on my preconceived notions of the path my life should take.

I,ve read many books that have left a lasting impression on me, though, but they all fall into the categories you've put the block on.


geoffh wrote:...not only could I not run anymore, but I became drawn into a nihilistic outlook t
As soon as I read this, I was reminded of Alan Sillitoe's, 'Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, part of which was made into a movie of the same name. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Loneli ... nce_Runner
I suspect it would be of interest to you. :wink:
Take care
Vic
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Jaysen
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Tue Jan 11, 2011 6:17 pm Post

vic-k wrote:I've read many books that have left a lasting impression on me, though, but …

Next time someone throws a book at you, duck. Then said book won't leave an impression!
Jaysen

I have a wife and 2 kids that I can only attribute to a wiggle, a giggle, and the realization that she was out of my league so I might as well be happy with her as a friend. 24 years marriage later, I can't imagine life without her. -Me 10/7/09

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vic-k
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Tue Jan 11, 2011 6:31 pm Post

pffffrrrttt!!!
As a professional, you, are your one and only asset. Without integrity you are worthless, but with it, you are priceless.