Scrolling within Index Cards

br
brookter
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Sun Sep 22, 2019 1:45 pm Post

Jack,

This is an interesting discussion, and I do want to make clear that I'm not trying to force you into working one way. I was trying to be helpful by showing you what is already available (it's still not clear to me that you are using all the existing features that are there which would help.)

I'd only make this comment:

I couldn't care less of the formatting was not there on the card, only if it is in the text in the editor.... There is no reason they can't be more than just synopses.


The problem is that the text on the card is a plain text file (which can't carry formatting) while the editor text is an .rtf file. If you want to edit the card text, then at best you're looking at syncing between the two files to keep them up to date, and in that case, you'll lose formatting in both. If you switch to using the main RTF file as the card text, then you're asking for a major redesign of the program. It's up to Keith (the designer) to decide whether that's worth it.

Ji
JimRac
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Sun Sep 22, 2019 5:51 pm Post

brookter wrote: ...If you want to edit the card text...
Hi brookter,

If I properly understand JD's request, he's not asking for editing capability.

He is asking for display (read-only) of the entire doc in the corkboard, with the capability to scroll thru the entire doc. All from the cork board itself, and if there is no Synopsis. So kind of like it works now, but being able to read the entire doc, not just first 50 characters.

@JD, is that right?

Best,
Jim
I’m just a customer.

sc
scshrugged
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Mon Sep 23, 2019 2:00 pm Post

This doesn’t supplant the wish list item, but might be found serviceable.

I find Quick Reference Panels (QR) useful tools* for viewing structure possibility. I set the relevant documents as Project Bookmarks prior to the viewing session so they’re available in QR Bookmark Sidebars. As needed, I toggle the menu item (or key the KB shortcut)––Window > Float Quick Reference Panels––to quickly move between QRs and the Editor setup. (After toggling it to off, click into the Editor to send the QRs to the background.)

In this case, the underlying window has a split of the Corkboard on the left, set to affect the right split—a document. Could have a scrivenings session, two documents and copyholders; whatever.The bottom left QR has its bookmarks sidebar open. Instead of opening the bookmark “Quick Reference Panels” in that QR, I right-clicked it and chose to open it as a new QR, now at the bottom right.

Screen Shot 2019-09-23 taken in Scriv Tutorial.png
Screen Shot 2019-09-23 taken in Scriv Tutorial.png (447.57 KiB) Viewed 325 times




*QRs can be opened as tabs or as separate windows.
In addition to the Bookmarks Sidebar, the mini Inspector is available, of course.
I'm a Scrivener user, not an L&L employee.

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Jack Daniel
Posts: 102
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2018 6:54 pm
Platform: Mac

Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:42 pm Post

JimRac wrote:

If I properly understand JD's request, he's not asking for editing capability.

He is asking for display (read-only) of the entire doc in the corkboard, with the capability to scroll thru the entire doc. All from the cork board itself, and if there is no Synopsis. So kind of like it works now, but being able to read the entire doc, not just first 50 characters.

@JD, is that right?

Best,
Jim


Yes, Jim, that is precisely right.

I'd like to make sure that everyone understands that I am not against synopses. If they work, and they work for many, then more power to them.

My experience has been that I haven't needed them. The reason: I know by title what is in a document, at least on the general level.

But this thread, and you kind folks, have helped me understand their worth a little better (I'm new at this—first novel), and I've found a good use for them.

Occasionally I run into a chapter in editing that has either:

1) too much narration in a row

or,

2) the ideas in the narration are multiple, and I'm jumping among them.

Neither of those are good for the reader objective experience. I've decided that bite-sized works best. If I run into a drafted chapter that has 800 words of dialog followed by 1,200 words of narration in a row, it reads sort of tedious.

My first inclination is to cut things. But often, as ruthless as I can be with the 'darlings', I come away convinced that all 2,000 words are good.

The problem turns out to be the two things above. So first, I comb through the 1,200 words of narration and find what are usually multiple topics jumbled together. Then I segregate them by moving paragraphs or sentences around to make the topics coherently together, yet separate from each other. That gives the narration natural break points.

Then, if I can, I break the dialogue up as well, and finally, I may end up with a layer cake of 400 words of narration times 3, and 400 of dialogue or action times 2—narration-dialogue-narration-dialogue-narration.

What I found astounding is that if the written words themselves are good and need to be there, that this, without changing the actual words, makes it read like a bat out of hell. It is now 2,000 words that go down very easy with a reader.

It's amazing what this change to mid-level structure can do. Very powerful, and probably my worst habit as a writer to draft things originally jumbled like that with too much narration in a row. This fixes that.

But how does one accomplish this?

Scrivener to the rescue.

I divide the dialogue and narration subjects into separate docs. For instance, if there are one or two paragraphs about subject A then a couple about subject B then maybe some of subject C, then back to A, I chop them up into sections (smaller docs) and write a synopsis for each one.

Then, using outliner mode, I can see this on a wide view. Then I rearrange the subjects so they are grouped, Then I do the same thing with dialogue (which is naturally not as jumbled) and find a natural break point for that.

Then comes the layer cake: 400-400-400-400-400. It's the same text, just in a different order that works an order of magnitude better than it did before, from the reader point of view. A little editing makes it all fit.

Of course this is a worst-case scenario, typically my narration comes in spates of 200-600 words, but I try to organize those and find break points there, too. The end result is a significant improvement over what was written originally, even if the text itself is not changed. Who knew? Not me.

So now I see the beauty of synopses, and the beauty of how to use them to solve this mid-level structure issue. Difficult to do this without a platform like Scrivener. I guess I'm learning.

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devinganger
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Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:27 pm Post

That's a great use case, and an informative use of using Scrivener's abilities to stitch multiple small documents seamlessly back together into bigger ones.
--
Devin L. Ganger
Not a L&L employee; opinions are those of my cat
Life has a way of moving you past wants and hopes