*short* wish list from a poet's perspective

je
jeffnesh
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Wed Mar 21, 2012 6:34 pm Post

Hi Keith,

Awesome program, I use it every day. I've used similar applications going back to CopyWrite around 2005, lots of work in Ulysses but Scrivener really feels like home. I have but *two* small feature requests that for my uses would make the program perfect. Okay, one small and one large, but I thought I'd try!

I use one (backed up!) project for all of my poetry-related work: thoughts and journaling, ideas and scraps, and poems (using the awesome snapshot feature to keep track of drafts.

My wish list:

1. Disconnect the line numbering from the ruler. I must have line numbering on (and particularly appreciate it in full screen mode), but have no use for the ruler. In fact, in full screen mode, the ruler is quite distracting. To my knowledge, the only way to show line numbering is to have the ruler visible as well.

2. I'd love to re-arrange the inspector panels. Because I use both document notes and snapshots extensively, I'd like to have both of those visible at the same time. I know that's very much a personal style thing, so arranging the panels through preferences would be great.

Thanks for all the hard work, and being open to suggestions.

-Jeff
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AmberV
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Thu Mar 22, 2012 3:36 am Post

One little hint for frequent inspector usage is the HNJMKL sequence. All of the inspector panels are bound to those letters in order (they make more sense if you look down at the keyboard), with the Ctrl-Opt-Cmd modifier sequence. So CoC-H is your notes and CoC-K is snapshots. They have two states. The first reveals and the second focuses if the pane is already revealed. This way if you are writing, and notes are open, you can hit CoC-H and immediately be typing in the notes field. If under the same conditions you wish to select a snapshot, CoC-K+K will show the snapshot pane and then focus you in the list so you can arrow key between snapshots (likewise stuff like CoC-J+J,Enter will jump to Keywords and enter a new keyword). CoC-E gets you back to the editor, by the way.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles

je
jeffnesh
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Thu Mar 22, 2012 3:59 am Post

Huh...who knew? Very useful!

Thanks. Don't suppose you have an equally crafty way to show line numbers without the keyboard, do you ;-) ?

Thanks for the quick response and great support,
Jeff
jeffnesheim.com
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AmberV
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Thu Mar 22, 2012 5:32 am Post

Ah, no unfortunately nothing to help you out there. The problem is that the line numbering gutter is an extension of the ruler so they can't be separated. Keith did try to make line numbering something independent before, but it was fragile and prone to getting out of whack when editing. So really all I can suggest is the Cmd-R shortcut that pops the whole thing up when you need it and then tucks it away when you want a more minimal interface. That works in full screen as well (as do these other shortcuts---snapshots excluded---by the way, they just pull up the appropriate floating inspector rather than the regular sidebar inspector).
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles

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KB
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Thu Mar 22, 2012 10:34 am Post

I will have another look at the line numbering rulers, though, to see if anything can be done.
"You can't waltz in here, use my toaster, and start spouting universal truths without qualification."

je
jeffnesh
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Thu Mar 22, 2012 4:40 pm Post

Thanks, Keith, for the consideration. Line numbers are perhaps my top personal requirement (though I may be alone in that) and if I could have them without the ruler, I'd be a phenomenally happy and content user!

Thanks,
Jeff
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KB
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Fri Mar 30, 2012 5:05 pm Post

The new beta allows line numbering to be turned on separately to the main ruler:

viewtopic.php?f=17&t=11692

All the best,
Keith
"You can't waltz in here, use my toaster, and start spouting universal truths without qualification."

lo
locklear
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Tue Oct 30, 2012 1:22 am Post

I should preface this by saying this poetry-related feature request is probably much more labor intensive than it's worth, but I was encouraged rather strongly to at least submit it, by another Scrivener user.

When working in established forms with fixed meters, I find it very useful to work with the poem proper in a pane on the left, and a "scratch pad" on the right, where I work out lines and do scansion, to ensure that I've kept the meter properly. As it is, this gets difficult to read fairly quickly, with unstressed syllables in lowercase and stressed in caps (bold or similar could also be used, but it doesn't help much), using pipes to separate feet. I'm certainly not after any kind of poetic meter check (computers are rubbish at counting syllables), but being able to clearly mark feet and stress would be very useful to me.

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AmberV
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Tue Oct 30, 2012 2:22 am Post

Could you post a screenshot of a typical worksheet approach like this? Maybe on a well known poem if you would rather not share one of yours. I think I grasp where you are going with this, but some of the jargon is unfamiliar to me. Two things that come to mind are inline annotations and highlights. Both can be stripped out of the document when compiling, and so are very useful for this kind of mark-up.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles

mb
mbbntu
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Tue Oct 30, 2012 8:19 am Post

I think if I were doing this I would just put an acute accent over the stressed syllables (one of the advantages of using a Mac is that it is so easy to insert accents). Anything that is not stressed doesn't need a mark.

Computers never seem to have been good at handling poetry, though. Simplicity itself to mark the scansion with pen on a piece of paper, but with a computer ...

Martin.
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lo
locklear
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Wed Oct 31, 2012 1:26 am Post

AmberV wrote:Could you post a screenshot of a typical worksheet approach like this? Maybe on a well known poem if you would rather not share one of yours. I think I grasp where you are going with this, but some of the jargon is unfamiliar to me. Two things that come to mind are inline annotations and highlights. Both can be stripped out of the document when compiling, and so are very useful for this kind of mark-up.


Sure. From "On His Blindness," by John Milton

When I |con SID| er HOW |my LIFE |is SPENT

Iambic pentameter, 5 feet, each unstressed then stressed. Caps represent stressed syllables. Yoinked it from http://cummingsstudyguides.net/xmeter.html, which provides more examples of other meters.

I considered highlights, but since I need to mark both feet and stress, I need at least one more mark. Accents, mentioned above, would be a pain for me (Windows), but beyond that, for visualization I want the whole stressed syllable marked.

mbbntu wrote:Computers never seem to have been good at handling poetry, though. Simplicity itself to mark the scansion with pen on a piece of paper, but with a computer ...


It's true. That said, at the moment, I'm holding myself to iambic pentameter (as above), as opposed to just listening for a scan that's pleasant and fits. The 10 syllable line, for some reason, just doesn't work in my head, and I have to go through a LOT of iterations to get a quatrain I like. Doing it on paper would mean a ton of erasing/a ton of pages. I'd like to avoid the tormented writer look, with a thousand wadded up sheets strewn around my workspace!

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temporalranger
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Wed Oct 31, 2012 1:47 am Post

Not a poet, so mostly just spitballing here, but would combining highlighting and underline work? Say, highlight every other foot and underline the stressed syllable? or bold/italic/font colour on the stressed syllable?

si
simeva
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Wed Nov 14, 2012 1:35 pm Post

AmberV wrote:One little hint for frequent inspector usage is the HNJMKL sequence. All of the inspector panels are bound to those letters in order (they make more sense if you look down at the keyboard), with the Ctrl-Opt-Cmd modifier sequence. So CoC-H is your notes and CoC-K is snapshots. They have two states. The first reveals and the second focuses if the pane is already revealed. This way if you are writing, and notes are open, you can hit CoC-H and immediately be typing in the notes field. If under the same conditions you wish to select a snapshot, CoC-K+K will show the snapshot pane and then focus you in the list so you can arrow key between snapshots (likewise stuff like CoC-J+J,Enter will jump to Keywords and enter a new keyword). CoC-E gets you back to the editor, by the way.


Does this work on the Windows version? What are the Win equivalents to Opt-Cmd ?

 

 

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