Reference Manager

rp
rpm
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:10 am
Platform: Mac

Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:32 am Post

Hello there!
First and foremost, thanks for a great writing tool. I use it every day for my academic writing (mostly literature essays). What I am really missing in Scrivener, and any other writing software, is a way to add my references and create a bibliography. I understand there are some ways, such as floating citations with bookends, but they seem complicated to me. So my suggestion/desire would be to have a way to manage references and citations directly in Scrivener without the need to rely on third-party software.

Thanks so much and very best wishes,

Raffaello

mb
mbbntu
Posts: 1113
Joined: Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:44 am
Platform: Mac + iOS
Location: Cambridge, UK.

Wed Mar 25, 2020 8:31 am Post

I'm just another customer, so I have no inside information, but I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for this. This idea has come up at various times over many years and the response has always been that it is outside the scope of the program. Having used bibliographic database software since the 1990s I would say that it is far too complex to bolt onto a writing program. That is why bibliographic databases (at least, the ones I know of) are stand-alone programs.
You should judge people not by how close they get to the top, but by how far they have come from the bottom. Some people have a mountain to climb just to get to the place where others start out. (Me, 2010)

rp
rpm
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:10 am
Platform: Mac

Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:08 am Post

Hi, thanks for your reply. May I ask which reference manager you use and how you make it work with Scrivener? I am striving to find a good solution...
Thanks again

Ki
Kinsey
Posts: 398
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:06 pm
Platform: Mac

Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:35 am Post

mbbntu might well add to this himself, but the two replies to this thread might be helpful:

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=60500&hilit=bookends

If you search the forum for threads on integrating Zotero or Bookends with Scrivener, you'll find plenty of advice. Good luck.

mb
mbbntu
Posts: 1113
Joined: Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:44 am
Platform: Mac + iOS
Location: Cambridge, UK.

Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:54 am Post

At the moment I use Bookends. As always, there are advantages and disadvantages with any solution. Over the years I have come to realise that any recommendation that a person can give will tell you as much about them, the work they do, and the way they like to do it, as it does about the program or solution they are using. My view is that we all have to find what works best for us, and that this is something that can only really be discovered by personal experimentation. Many years ago I wrote a 560-page book, which had something over 300 references, using Word 5 and EndNote. In the intervening period I have used Sente and Papers (the former is defunct, the latter had a horrible transition between versions a few years back) and I have played with Mendeley, BibDesk and Zotero. The only program that has stuck with me is Bookends. I used it in conjunction with Scrivener 2.5 to write an 85,000-word thesis (I cannot remember the number of references). The combination worked very well for me. Others have different needs, but I have found that having used Bookends, moved away, and then moved back to it, I am unlikely to change again. It is undoubtedly a big and complex program, but it is constantly under development, it has an iOS version (which is useful) and pretty extensive documentation. The developer is responsive to changes in databases like Google Scholar and JSTOR, which is important to those who use them. But in the end, only you can know how you like to work, and you may only discover that by trying out a few options. In my case I found that hitting Command-Y became ingrained in my habits. If I need more complicated stuff I can call on Keyboard Maestro, which is a marvellous Mac utility.
You should judge people not by how close they get to the top, but by how far they have come from the bottom. Some people have a mountain to climb just to get to the place where others start out. (Me, 2010)