Who want a Linux release version?

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Monolecte
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Fri Jul 24, 2015 1:10 pm Post

So, I am.

And I'm ready to pay for it. :D

Next one.
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ha
happydemic
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Fri Jul 24, 2015 3:58 pm Post

Scrivener on Linux is mostly great, but it still has some significant bugs.

I'll be delighted to pay for it once those are fixed. I would be less happy to be asked to pay for the current beta.

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Monolecte
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Tue Jul 28, 2015 6:20 am Post

I more think about crowdfunding to engage development.
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Na
Nauta
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Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:51 am Post

I'd wish a version as good the official for Mac. And, in this case, I would pay as, in fact, I did when I had a Mac machine.

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pigfender
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Wed Aug 05, 2015 9:06 am Post

Actually, I'm fine without one.
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garpu
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Thu Aug 06, 2015 5:15 am Post

pigfender wrote:Actually, I'm fine without one.
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Yeah, but we all know you're weird. :D
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pigfender
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Thu Aug 06, 2015 6:49 am Post

That is true.:P

What would it take to have a stable Linux release that could be sold with the same confidence as the Mac and Win versions? I mean, sure, it'd take a few extra support staff versed in the various "distros" (I believe you cats are callin' 'em), but what technically?

For example: Are the "distros" so varied that they'd need dedicated releases? Does the interface need a radical rework / skin? Do certain functions rely on OS systems (like the Mac one uses the OS text engine) that would need to be completely worked up from scratch (obviously not something as central as the text system needs it or you wouldn't have a beta, but I guess things like spelling, PDF conversion and other discrete tasks could fall under that category?)

Would you be happy to pay a reduced fee for an unsupported but non-time-limited version?
"Some dice only have sixes." nom, 19 Oct 2013
"Piggy, I'm beginning to wonder if you are the best person to take advice from." Jaysen, 26 Sept 2014

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garpu
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Thu Aug 06, 2015 9:23 pm Post

*shrugs*

The Linux version now works better than the windows version (via WINE) did for me at release. I'd definitely pay money for it. For me, as long as I've got the tar.gz (that is, distro-independent version) I'm fine. I can't speak for others, though.
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ha
happydemic
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Fri Aug 14, 2015 2:57 pm Post

I think after all the hard work we Linux beta-testers have put into identifying bugs and supporting each other, it would be a nice gesture for L&L to reassure Linux users that we are not going to be left without any product at all. Ideally I hope they might pledge that if they decide not to proceed with the Linux product, they will produce a final Linux beta release with no time restriction on it.

I'm happy to pay for market-ready releases, as I said above, but I agree with this post that crowdfunding in advance might not be feasible.

If L&L were to decide not to proceed with Linux development, then perhaps someone else might develop an open source product which is compatible with the .scriv format (if that is legal).

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underpope
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Fri Aug 14, 2015 9:32 pm Post

I spent money on the WINE version of Scrivener, but ended up being very disappointed in it (found it pretty much unusable, actually). Then I finally downloaded the .deb file of the current Scrivener for Linux installation. I'm very happy with it, find it nice and stable on my Kubuntu desktop, and so on. However, I'm reluctant to use it for long projects, knowing that it's going to expire on January 1, 2016. That's less than six months away, and without assurance that there will be a version after that, I don't know if I will continue to use it.

I would be happy to spend money on a Linux version, even though I've already spent money on the WINE version.

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pigfender
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Sat Aug 15, 2015 9:25 am Post

So there are no bits that don't work? The only thing is that some people might need help getting it installed and running in the first place, and there's no official technical support?
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Graybyrd
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Sat Aug 15, 2015 5:23 pm Post

pigfender wrote:So there are no bits that don't work? The only thing is that some people might need help getting it installed and running in the first place, and there's no official technical support?


I wouldn't go that far. The basic 'engine' works just fine: composition, gathering, splitting, and compiling, etc. But there are a number of peripheral issues such as .pdf, the scratchpad, and ... for 64-bit versions, the spell-checker difficulties, etc. All these can be seen & reviewed in the various threads here on the Linux forum. Those users for whom these issues are deal-breakers have pretty much gone silent or left; others who value the basic features just chew on their knuckles but otherwise stay quiet.

Some hint that the expiration deadline will be revisited with another beta upgrade, or at least some word that the current version won't be dumped and left to expire would be a good thing. Most everyone here has been pretty patient and understanding, yes?

Personally, I'd think that with the massive slow-motion train wreck otherwise known as Windows 10, that L & L would be more seriously looking to the alternate Linux universe. It's not difficult to compile for the major Linux distributions. Mozilla Firefox is an outstanding example.
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devinganger
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Sat Aug 15, 2015 7:29 pm Post

Graybyrd wrote:Personally, I'd think that with the massive slow-motion train wreck otherwise known as Windows 10, that L & L would be more seriously looking to the alternate Linux universe. It's not difficult to compile for the major Linux distributions. Mozilla Firefox is an outstanding example.


I love how after every Windows release, there are always predictions that the Linux desktop market is going to become a serious alternative. The fact of the matter is, Linux is too scattered and widespread for the majority of consumers to ever get into it. If someone gets confused with an upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10, do you REALLY think they're going to dive into Linux and figure that out?

There's a reason Apple's MacOSX laptops have been quietly gaining marketshare. That and Android -- not a trad Linux distro -- will be the winners IF there is a large-scale revolt from Windows. But I submit XP as counter-evidence -- most people stick with the older stuff that they know and find ways to keep getting it onto their newer hardware.
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Graybyrd
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Sat Aug 15, 2015 10:25 pm Post

I love how after every Windows release, there are always predictions that the Linux desktop market is going to become a serious alternative. The fact of the matter is, Linux is too scattered and widespread for the majority of consumers to ever get into it. If someone gets confused with an upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10, do you REALLY think they're going to dive into Linux and figure that out?


No, I don't expect the majority of disaffected Windows users will switch to Linux. Nor does anyone I know claim that Linux will become a majority desktop. However, for those of us who seek an alternative to Windows, Linux is one of two alternatives available. Switching to MacOS with its accompanying hardware and software investment is very expensive, so Linux is worth investigating.

I'm a bit puzzled why a simple suggestion that L&L increase its focus on the Linux beta of Scrivener should elicit such a negative response. As for Windows 10, the earlier reference to the Guardian article pretty much summarizes a growing dislike and distrust of the release. Which is good reason for some to seek an alternative.
On my honor, I will do my best not to do anything unlawful, infringing, disruptive, harmful, threatening, abusive, tortious, defamatory, libelous, lewd, profane, obscene, hateful or otherwise objectionable. Pinky Promise. :mrgreen:

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tjward
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Mon Aug 17, 2015 2:46 am Post

I'd buy Scrivener for Linux.. even though it works pretty well under Wine.
I'd just rather have a Linux version.

Personally, I found Linux Mint Cinnamon to be more than ready for prime time. The installation was simplistic and brief.. It would take someone prone to confusion to be challenged by it at all. I found it intuitive and logical. The interface, simple and elegant. The availability of applications, more than sufficient for my needs. It is very reminiscent of my Windows 7 desktop. I'm sure it's not for everyone.. neither is Windows.

The hardest part of switching to Linux was simply deciding to do it.