Which Linux distro do you use for Scrivener?

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Jaysen
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Location: East-Be-Jesus-Nowhere SC, USA

Thu Oct 09, 2014 12:21 pm Post

billie wrote:little perseverance you will get a great deal more from Linux than with a Mac

You may under estimate the word in bold. As a unix guy for a large company it is easy for me to agree with you. It just might be that you and I have a natural aptitude or learning style that makes this easier for us than others. For folks that see computers as "fancy paper", they will likely get no "more" from any OS than an other. As a matter of fact they my have the opposite experience than you or me because
billie wrote:Anything you need to know about Linux, just google it and you should get an answer easily enough.

Maybe my uses are esoteric, but most useful information is buried behind many posts that aren't all that helpful. Again, look at the answer from someone who is new… apt vs yum isn't a big change if you are familiar with package managers, but it is frightening compared to a double click.

That said, a bit of work and note taking can make linux a wonderful platform for anyone.
Jaysen

I have a wife and 2 kids that I can only attribute to a wiggle, a giggle, and the realization that she was out of my league so I might as well be happy with her as a friend. 26 years marriage later, I can't imagine life without her. -Me 10/7/09

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garpu
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Platform: Linux

Thu Oct 09, 2014 10:16 pm Post

apt vs yum isn't a big change if you are familiar with package managers, but it is frightening compared to a double click.


Heh, my FIL just installed Ubuntu on a mac of his wanting to learn linux. I'm wondering if we should keep some liquid courage on hand (for him, that is) when he tries to do the "./configure && make && sudo make install" thing for the first time. :)

The problem with Linux is that to know how to do more than the basics (that is, where you really learn to control the OS) takes a working knowledge of linux. "Just read the man page" doesn't really do much good, if you're just starting out. If you're not sure of what the problem is, finding an answer can be difficult.

(And here's where I insert a plug for linuxquestions.org. It's got a pretty good community--so long as systemd isn't discussed--and any issue I've asked about has had a prompt and intelligent reply. It's also the "unofficial official" slackware forum, for what it's worth.)
Slackware-current 64-bit, XFCE

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Jaysen
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Fri Oct 10, 2014 10:37 am Post

garpu wrote:"Just read the man page" doesn't really do much good

RTFM is the silliest concept.

yes, folks should do some basic leg work. But until every stinking document details all the concepts and provides context for the proper use of those concepts, you can not chastise the novice. They may not even know what manual to look read.

This is one of the biggest L&L lessons. They (and other fora members) answer every question no matter how repeat and obvious. Every noob is a noob. Be nice to them and hold their hand.

As to the FIL, take a truly educational approach. It's what I do. An hour or two discussing things like AT&T unix, C, the history of shells, then the advent of PC and the horror of System0-9 and (MS|PC)DOS/OS2. This will loop you back to the BSD/MINIX/LINUX world. I've found that this approach sets folks in the mind of "traditional explorer" and increases their tendency to think of the problem as "learn the classic approach".

My "teaching" approach for noobs uses the following segments (omit what isn't needed or just a brief overview):
1. History
2. What is a system?
3. What does the OS really do?
4. How you talk to an OS, shells and basic commands
5. System space vs user space
6. Networks
7. The internet is a big network
8. The UIs: Console and X windows
9. How to use Google.

That and lots of liquid courage.
Jaysen

I have a wife and 2 kids that I can only attribute to a wiggle, a giggle, and the realization that she was out of my league so I might as well be happy with her as a friend. 26 years marriage later, I can't imagine life without her. -Me 10/7/09

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garpu
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Fri Oct 10, 2014 3:08 pm Post

That and lots of liquid courage.


Heh, I'll need some if he ever needs to compile a kernel. ;) Not hard, just a lot of moving parts, and lots of places where things can go wrong in a scary way.
Slackware-current 64-bit, XFCE

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Jaysen
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Fri Oct 10, 2014 3:27 pm Post

garpu wrote:
That and lots of liquid courage.


Heh, I'll need some if he ever needs to compile a kernel. ;) Not hard, just a lot of moving parts, and lots of places where things can go wrong in a scary way.

Do people still do that for every day use?

I do it for embedded stuff, but thats to get small space and faster GPIO. Why would you do that as a casual user?
Jaysen

I have a wife and 2 kids that I can only attribute to a wiggle, a giggle, and the realization that she was out of my league so I might as well be happy with her as a friend. 26 years marriage later, I can't imagine life without her. -Me 10/7/09

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fi
fireraven
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Joined: Fri Sep 19, 2014 1:47 am
Platform: Linux + Windows

Fri Oct 10, 2014 3:33 pm Post

garpu wrote:
That and lots of liquid courage.


Heh, I'll need some if he ever needs to compile a kernel. ;) Not hard, just a lot of moving parts, and lots of places where things can go wrong in a scary way.


Not hard? I've never done it myself because I've had no need to, but all the books I've read make it sound like one of the easier things to compile. =P

I can say as someone who has been using Linux for years that a person who just needs a computer to work can find most anything they need built into the more popular Linux distros. Everything I've had to compile or do research on has been for niche projects I was working on.

Jayson wrote:Do people still do that for every day use?

I do it for embedded stuff, but thats to get small space and faster GPIO. Why would you do that as a casual user?


As for compiling a kernel he might want to do something like install security enhanced linux or something. Perhaps he may decide that he wants some more features of the kernel added in or a patch he saw somewhere that he thought was snazzy. I doubt it's much an everyday user will need. Crazy things happen though.

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Jaysen
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Fri Oct 10, 2014 3:46 pm Post

I can think of lots of reasons to need compilation of modules. there isn't much that is in user space that needs a full kernel build though. most of the security tools are modular.

I get it for non-casual users. Seems like kernel builds are "the tales of old men* in suspenders"

* No woman would be caught dead in suspenders.
Jaysen

I have a wife and 2 kids that I can only attribute to a wiggle, a giggle, and the realization that she was out of my league so I might as well be happy with her as a friend. 26 years marriage later, I can't imagine life without her. -Me 10/7/09

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Me
Mercurania
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Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2014 7:18 pm
Platform: Linux + Windows

Sun Oct 12, 2014 7:28 pm Post

I just installed Scrivener 1.6.* in a Debian-machine 7.6 64b, with MATE for environtment.

I am installing dictionaries now, and I tried open one of my proyects under Windows, with success. Only I missed can change the language (menues, etc.) to Spanish, as in Windows.

pi
pictograph
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 1:05 pm
Platform: Linux

Wed Oct 15, 2014 1:48 pm Post

Linux Mint 17 64-bit

I bought the mac version of scrivener two years ago and am happy with it. But since I'm jumping ship from mac I want to put my vote in for the linux version.

l0
l0ck3
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Sep 30, 2014 1:55 pm
Platform: Linux

Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:15 pm Post

LMDE Cinnamon (Debian 3.11.8-1)
Seems to work well on Mint. Had a challenge at first installing, but I reinstalled and it has (knock on wood) worked well.

Ja
Jaaaarne
Posts: 57
Joined: Tue Mar 08, 2011 8:07 am
Platform: Linux + Windows

Thu Nov 13, 2014 1:15 pm Post

Xubuntu 14 on an old Samsung NC10 netbook. Installed on count one-two, no hitch whatsoever.

NC10 is the last mobile computer I've seen which has a normal keyboard. I really hate those modern island type disasters which are now called keyboards and installed in all laptops. Now it kind of looks like I'm stuck with this old machine. :)

Actually I have two Scriveners on it, because Xubuntu is in dual boot with Win XP originally installed on it. I just usually prefer to boot into Xubuntu, I like the feel of it.

Na
Nauta
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Joined: Sat Nov 09, 2013 4:32 pm
Platform: Mac + Linux

Mon Nov 17, 2014 6:22 pm Post

Ubuntu, 14.04, with Unity.

bi
biffster
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2012 11:36 pm
Platform: Linux

Sun Nov 23, 2014 3:41 pm Post

Whoa, talk about topic creep! Although to me fair, most "What distro are you using" forum topics do end up devolving into a "Linux isn't a good desktop OS!" argument thread. Such is life.

I'm using Scrivener for Linux 1.7.2.3 beta (64 bit), running on Linux Mint 17 XFCE. I am happy to report that I am having zero issues! I had seen quirks and minor issues in previous versions of Scrivener, but not anymore. It is rock-solid, and I'm in love!!! Color me happy!

Here's a screenshot of my utilitarian but insanely effective Writing setup:

Image

to
tosca
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2014 9:06 am
Platform: Linux

Tue Nov 25, 2014 9:09 am Post

Just installed Scrivener yesterday, and going through the tutorials.
I'm running Fedora 20.

pe
petethescribe
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Joined: Wed Dec 03, 2014 1:22 am
Platform: Linux

Wed Dec 03, 2014 1:31 am Post

I'm running it on Linux Mint, in the Mate environment. (On a lenovo T61) Worked like a champ all through NaNo, no problems to speak of during 50,000 words.