Scrivener 2 for Windows?

Ar
Arphaxad
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Thu Dec 26, 2013 6:11 pm Post

Sorry if this has been asked and answered. I looked arond and could not find the answer.

When is the Windows version of scrivener going to catch up with the Mac version? I was watching the tutorials and saw some cool things with file templates and then was greatly dissapointed when I was unable to do this on my windows version.

Over all I am loving Scrivener, you have an awesome program. Only wish Windows version was up to date.

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AmberV
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Thu Dec 26, 2013 9:32 pm Post

We can't give any dates for that yet, because it's just not possible to fairly predict when it will be ready. Since you've relatively new to the software, you probably haven't seen it evolve much yet, but rest assured that even within the two years it has been out, much has been added to the program that was originally omitted from the original feature framework (which was already in excess of our original plans of releasing something more like Scrivener 1.x for the Mac, it is already well beyond that point). We'll have some more goodies for you coming soon as well. :) Thanks for your patience, we've got seven years (and counting, the Mac version doesn't hold still either!) to catch up on.
.:.
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Hk
Hknapp99
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Sun Dec 29, 2013 4:59 pm Post

Still it would be great to get Scrivener 2, after all these years of waiting ;-(
The ipad is great, but it is ultimately a toy (& great ebook reader), not suitable for real work.
I hope you will not forget the windows user ...

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AmberV
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Mon Dec 30, 2013 2:34 am Post

Our development strategy does not mix platforms between people. Working on iOS does not slow down Windows, or vice versa. Each platform has its own dedicated development.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
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garpu
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Mon Dec 30, 2013 8:34 pm Post

Scrivener for Android would make me consider getting a tablet of some sort. Then again if it's Qt based, it might just be a matter of recompiling it... 8) Ipads are nifty, but I think having to deal with iOS and Apple would turn me into an American version of Malcom Tucker.

But I don't do as much mobile computing as I used to. (I'm not in grad school anymore, and I don't fly from one coast to the other every few months.) A tablet might be an expensive toy. (I do love my bog-standard Kindle, though.)
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AmberV
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Mon Dec 30, 2013 10:50 pm Post

A “simple” recompile wouldn’t be impossible, but we’d rather fine-tune the UI to best address the context (plus, while we do that with iOS we can use the extra development resources to get PC/Linux caught up). All of those buttons, menus and labels, shrunk down so they are hard to read and hard to use—never mind the binder+editor/editor+inspector model is too bulky for a smaller screen.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
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garpu
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Tue Dec 31, 2013 2:56 pm Post

Ah yeah. Runs without crashing, looks good, functional on the platform. Pick two. :(
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Ja
Janus
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Tue Dec 31, 2013 6:06 pm Post

Hello :)
I have been following the development of Scrivener for a while now (from afar) and am already a big fan. I have a big project in (mental) development and once I am good and ready to start putting pen to paper your software will definitely be involved. ;)

My question or "two cents" runs along the lines of the original question...
- I understand the difficulties of catching the Windows version up to the Mac Version, but do you have no information, ideas at all when this might happen? (2014, 2015,...?)
- I also ask not only out of curiosity but also because of the issues mentioned here...
https://scrivener.tenderapp.com/help/kb ... patibility
...as well as your new/beta version for Linux.
- Since Scrivener is designed to be cross-platform compatible I (and many others) would really be interested to know (or get an idea) on when that might actually happen?
- A dedicated thread in your knowledge base for updates and such on this issue would be highly appreciated.

Let me finish by saying that I am really looking forward to seeing all the features of the Mac version in the Windows and Linux version as well... sooner rather than later. ;)
I wish you all a happy and successful new year.
Thank you for your great work. :)

P.S.:
One more question on a different matter...
If I buy a version of Scrivener, how long or for how many updates is that buy "valid"?
Would I need to buy Scrivener again after it switches from e.g. version 1.99 to version 2.0?

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garpu
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Tue Dec 31, 2013 8:02 pm Post

I can speak for cross-platform compatibility... So long as you're using Scrivener 2.0 or higher on OSX, you shouldn't have problems. I've started projects on a mac, edited it on Linux, then used the Windows version on it. Only time I've had trouble was when I had Windows 7 compatibility enabled under WINE (don't do that, folks, bad things happen) and tried to open a backup created on the windows version without deleting the "shadow" files first. (so long as you either unzip it, delete the files of size 0, AND ONLY THEN open it up under Scrivener of any version, you should be fine. Or just zip it up outside of Scrivener.)

So the times I've had problems, it's been my own fault. :)
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JoshT
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Mon Jan 06, 2014 7:24 pm Post

I get not wanting to give people false hope, but I too would like even a general idea of when we might expect things to be the same across the board. Not a date, but maybe even a year? Surely there's some time table you're looking at?

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SarsenLintel
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Mon Jan 06, 2014 7:34 pm Post

KB wrote:All I'll say is that we are going to be working hard to get the Mac and Windows versions in line by the end of 2014. If that seems a long time, it's only because we have some new features planned for the Mac version next year too. :)

- from this thread: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=25223

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DavidR
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Mon Jan 06, 2014 7:42 pm Post

JoshT wrote:I get not wanting to give people false hope, but I too would like even a general idea of when we might expect things to be the same across the board. Not a date, but maybe even a year? Surely there's some time table you're looking at?

I understand the sense of frustration about this. But I also understand why they don't want to give any dates at all. Software development seems like it ought to be a straightforward process, but it's not. A complex program is a real ecology, and when the butterfly of text formatting flaps its wings, an unanticipated hurricane can appear in document structuring (so to speak, and to give a random, not-well-informed example). Moving through a checklist of features to add or update is likely to generate sub- and sub-sub-checklists. And then there's a literal storm that causes a days-long power outage; and/or your server service has a meltdown or changes hands.

I speak, not from personal experience as a developer, but from experience as a user of amazing software created by small, dedicated companies who, with a tiny fraction of the resources of Microsoft and Google, are creating programs that run rings around the giants' offerings. Users quite understandably want to know at least what year, for heaven's sake, they're going to see the next update; and developers, quite wisely, know that even that broad of a "deadline" is not really within their control.
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Jaysen
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Mon Jan 06, 2014 8:07 pm Post

DavidR wrote:
JoshT wrote:I get not wanting to give people false hope, but I too would like even a general idea of when we might expect things to be the same across the board. Not a date, but maybe even a year? Surely there's some time table you're looking at?

I understand the sense of frustration about this. But I also understand why they don't want to give any dates at all. Software development seems like it ought to be a straightforward process, but it's not. A complex program is a real ecology, and when the butterfly of text formatting flaps its wings, an unanticipated hurricane can appear in document structuring (so to speak, and to give a random, not-well-informed example). Moving through a checklist of features to add or update is likely to generate sub- and sub-sub-checklists. And then there's a literal storm that causes a days-long power outage; and/or your server service has a meltdown or changes hands.

I speak, not from personal experience as a developer, but from experience as a user of amazing software created by small, dedicated companies who, with a tiny fraction of the resources of Microsoft and Google, are creating programs that run rings around the giants' offerings. Users quite understandably want to know at least what year, for heaven's sake, they're going to see the next update; and developers, quite wisely, know that even that broad of a "deadline" is not really within their control.

As an "IT guy" working in the bowels of large organization, I can tell you that the above is 100% on. Even with massive resources companies can miss dates due to things as simple as a snowstorm or as complicated as a supplier using an old development tool for compiling a static library (which only took 15 days of management bureaucracy before two techs were allowed to identify the issue in 30 seconds). If you had to choose between a date and "it actually works" most folks would prefer "it actually works".
Jaysen

I have a wife and 2 kids that I can only attribute to a wiggle, a giggle, and the realization that she was out of my league so I might as well be happy with her as a friend. 26 years marriage later, I can't imagine life without her. -Me 10/7/09

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ti
timmib
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Fri Jan 10, 2014 1:44 am Post

Greetings,

I'm not sure if my comment belongs in this thread but ...

I'd really like to know if the next version of Scrivener for Windows is going to include web clipping. I am ready to unify my various tools into using Scrivener exclusively for note taking as well as writing. But I find that web clipping is too integral to my work to make the conversion now without some idea if basic, simple web clipping is going to be included. I purely like the scrivener approach. It's just that I've got a lot of material to convert. I'll keep on keeping on until ...

Be well,

Kim

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AmberV
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Fri Jan 10, 2014 4:36 am Post

Could you describe what you mean by a “web clipping”? Scrivener already provides a couple of ways to import web pages, and of course if all you need is a piece of text from a page, you can just copy and paste. Were you thinking of something else?
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles