Ctrl-G to access menus doesn't work

dr
drmajorbob
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Sat Aug 08, 2020 6:33 pm Post

In Scrivener 1, I'm told Ctrl-G Ctrl-Z inserts a page break.

I'd never want to do that, but I can't get Ctrl-G to do ANYTHING. It doesn't take me to menu options.

Any idea why? (Windows 10 under Parallels on the Mac)

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DavidR
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Sun Aug 09, 2020 1:59 am Post

Ctrl+G is one of Scrivener's delightful little idiosyncrasies. (It's delightful, I tell you.) I don't know what the technical programming term is, but it's a kind of prefix or signal: it tells the program to interpret the next keypress as a corresponding instruction. But you have to know what the needed keypress is before you press Ctrl+G; Ctrl+G by itself doesn't open any menus or do anything else, and if you press it, then press something else to try to find the proper second keypress, you've broken the spell, so to speak. So if you press Ctrl+G then immediately press Ctrl+Z you get the page break. Ctrl+G Ctrl+D opens the Scrivener link dialog. Etc. It's fun, it's quirky, it's delightful, I tell you. Ahem. It is actually very efficient once you've memorized the particular second keypresses you're actually going to use all the time. My understanding is that it will be present still in the new v. 3. Hope this helps.
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Jestar
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Sun Aug 09, 2020 2:11 am Post

drmajorbob wrote:In Scrivener 1, I'm told Ctrl-G Ctrl-Z inserts a page break.

I'd never want to do that, but I can't get Ctrl-G to do ANYTHING. It doesn't take me to menu options.

Any idea why? (Windows 10 under Parallels on the Mac)

Screen Shot 2020-08-08 at 13.32.52.png

Turn on "Show Invisibles", then try what you were trying to do. You should end up with a line where you are putting in the Ctrl+G, Ctrl+Z.
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Before insert of page break
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After insertion of page break
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Win 10 Ent. 64-Bit 2004
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Scrivener Version: Version: 1.9.16.0 - 14 Nov 2019 & Version: 2.9.9.11 Beta (1078406) 64-bit - 14 Oct 2020

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devinganger
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Sun Aug 09, 2020 10:07 am Post

DavidR wrote:Ctrl+G is one of Scrivener's delightful little idiosyncrasies. (It's delightful, I tell you.) I don't know what the technical programming term is, but it's a kind of prefix or signal: it tells the program to interpret the next keypress as a corresponding instruction.


I believe that the term you are looking for is an "accelerator."
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dr
drmajorbob
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Mon Aug 10, 2020 9:03 am Post

Disregard all after "hello". I was pressing Ctrl-S when I meant Ctrl-Z, and I didn't test other Ctrl-G commands.

My bad.

HOWEVER, on a related note, the manual twice mentions View->Show Invisibles, but there's no such menu item. Not at my machine.

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JimRac
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Tue Aug 11, 2020 4:14 pm Post

drmajorbob wrote:HOWEVER, on a related note, the manual twice mentions View->Show Invisibles, but there's no such menu item. Not at my machine.
In v1, it's Format > Options > Show Invisibles.
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AmberV
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Tue Aug 11, 2020 10:16 pm Post

I believe the practice is more common in modern UNIX software, though some old DOS programs worked that way as well (like Wordstar). These days you’ll find them in LyX and Emacs, and if you count the truly bizarre way in which Vim handles commands, those are technically multi-key “shortcuts” as well. Like how 2>j will indent the current and following two lines—but only while the editor is in command mode vs insertion mode, naturally.
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devinganger
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Wed Aug 12, 2020 5:39 am Post

AmberV wrote:the truly bizarre way in which Vim handles commands


...which isn't bizarre at all if your UNIX usage goes back far enough you actually used ed back before vi became a thing. Vi was simply duplicating the command interface of ed. (Those of you MS-DOS folks who are old enough to remember edlin, same family of horror.)
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Silverdragon
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Wed Aug 12, 2020 5:44 am Post

Time has mercifully erased my memories of vi...

Ta
TadeoBlanco

Wed Aug 12, 2020 8:20 am Post

Devinganger - shame on you. Mention of edlin has triggered nightmares again. 8) That and ED in cp/m.

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devinganger
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Wed Aug 12, 2020 9:32 am Post

Astaff wrote:Devinganger - shame on you. Mention of edlin has triggered nightmares again. 8) That and ED in cp/m.


They both beat using magnetic needles to create the ones and zeroes by hand...
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DavidR
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Wed Aug 12, 2020 4:15 pm Post

Fun -- or at least stimulating -- trip down memory lane. Thanks, Devin, for "accelerator."

Yes, edlin.... The amazing thing is that at some point it must have seemed like an improvement over something else ... magnetic needles maybe.
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Silverdragon
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Wed Aug 12, 2020 4:50 pm Post

Hubby used to toggle in what we would call now the BIOS. With switches. Every morning.

Ta
TadeoBlanco

Thu Aug 13, 2020 9:36 pm Post

Silverdragon wrote:Hubby used to toggle in what we would call now the BIOS. With switches. Every morning.


Something like this?

People now bitch if our computer isn't 'instant on' - we used to spend half an hour just getting it ready to run a couple of lines.

Try running Scrivener on that!

My second computer was a Z80 TRS80 compatible. Every component hand soldered.
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DavidR
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Thu Aug 13, 2020 9:41 pm Post

Well, I keypunched entries for a research index of periodical articles (with stopword list to attend to, etc.) onto IBM cards. 80 characters max per index entry, while including all significant people and facts, made newspaper "headline style" sound like Shakespeare. And make a typo (typing Arabic and Hebrew names), redo the card.
David
Scrivener for Windows Version 1.9.9
Windows 7 Pro 64-bit

What's the difference between a free lance and a loose cannon?