About note cards

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dougal217
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Sat Jul 29, 2017 2:02 am Post

I'm old school... still stuck in the days when we used index cards to make notes for a report or thesis. The notes on the cork board replicate this, at least visually, and I've been writing the actual note in the synopsis portion. Then, in the corkboard, one can see all his notes and arrange them in the desired fashion. The only problem is that when one sets up a split-screen, with a blank document for writing in one pane, and the notes on the other, the writing in the synopsis portion disappears as soon as the cursor is in the document pane. Using documents for notes of course avoids this problem, except then you can't see the content of the document when using the corkboard.

I guess I'm wondering what sorts of "best practices" people are using to write using notes. Thanks 8)

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steveshank
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Sat Jul 29, 2017 7:24 pm Post

You may be way in advance of me, but here's what I do. (perhaps not best practice).

When I write I do not use the split screen, but the normal scrivener mode, but keep the far right column (inspector) open most of the time. The inspector always shows the synopsis. Furthermore, there is also a place for project and document notes in addition. As well as status, keywords, metadata (whatever fields you want to create for your organization) and even comments on particular words or phrases within the document. Also references and footnotes.

Anyway, you'll be able to see your synopsis while typing.

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dougal217
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Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:15 am Post

Thanks, Steve 8)

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AmberV
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Wed Aug 09, 2017 8:22 am Post

As noted, I think the Inspector may be what you are looking for? I’m not quite clear on what you mean by the synopses on the corkboard disappearing when you type in a document in the other split though—they should be right where you left them.

If you mean to say you are using the inspector and would like to have it stick to the corkboard side even while typing in another document in the other split, then there is indeed a feature that enables that way of working. With the focus over on the corkboard side initially, click the little padlock icon in the inspector, on the same row as the buttons that toggle between tabs. That locks it to the split that is currently active, meaning you can switch over to the document and retain all additional notes and such attached to the cards on the corkboard.
.:.
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MSO
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Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:59 am Post

You can keep the Inspector pane open and still use notecards as in this layout:

Image


Or you can use the Outliner mode when making changes. The Synopsis in the Outliner will be the same one you see on your notecards.

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dougal217
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Thu Sep 07, 2017 1:28 am Post

Sorry to be coming back to this so late, folks

Thank you for the help. My issue was a bit minor -- if you highlight an index card in the corkboard, its contents appear in detail in the Inspector; but when you click on the text page on the opposite pane, the card gets deselected and, although you can still see what's on it in the Corkboard, if it's a long note the rest of the note in the Inspector disappears. It's not a major issue

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AmberV
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Thu Sep 07, 2017 2:36 pm Post

For the sake of clarity, are you saying that locking the inspector to one split does not address what you are referring to? It sounds to me as though it would entirely resolve the matter.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles