NaNo demo thingy

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Foxtrot
Posts: 102
Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:46 pm
Platform: Mac

Tue Nov 02, 2010 10:06 pm Post

I have been a Scrivener user for a around 18 Months but downloaded the V2 NaNo version last week and, obviously, have started using it for NaNo.

Just as a means of procrastination from writing I tried to "buy online" - from the first screen, but it appears I can only buy at the full price for a new user using the NaNo demo as there is no option for an existing user of Version 1 to buy from that link. I know it is worth the extra but...

I don't want to lose my meagre (so far, as I am just revving up!) output for NaNo on the demo version so I am bit dubious about just going in my V1 and upgrading as I have no idea what that will do to my NaNo demo- probably nothing I guess, but I am not a gambler.

I know there is no hurry so just let me know what I need to do as and when, and some time after you have stopped tutting and rolling your eyes at my stupidity ;-)
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Ed
Eddy
Posts: 197
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2010 8:00 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: Brighton, UK
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Tue Nov 02, 2010 10:27 pm Post

Basically the NaNo version is the same as 2.0, just a slightly earlier version. You can upgrade from anywhere, it doesn't matter and it won't hurt your NaNo install. During the purchase process, if you enter your email address and they have you on record as qualifying for the upgrade discount then it should be applied - the shop has all the details. Once you've installed 2.0, you can just carry on editing your NaNo project using 2.0 instead of the NaNo version. In fact I'd get rid of the NaNo version from the Apps folder as soon as you have the 'full' 2.0.

When you open projects created with 1.x using 2.0, a backup copy of the project will be made for you (the backup will stay in 1.x format) and the original project will be upgraded to 2.0 format. You cannot open 2.0 projects with 1.x, but there really shouldn't be a need to in any case.

Eddy
"Writerʼs block is just a symptom of feeling like you have nothing to say, combined with the rather weird idea that you SHOULD feel the need to say something." - Hugh MacLeod