Apple M1 Processor

ro
ron777
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Mon Nov 23, 2020 5:25 pm Post

I have been a dedicated Apple desktop computer/Scrivener user for many years. I have allowed my Apple MacBook Pro to sit on a shelf, mainly due to my dislike of the keyboard—I prefer a mechanical keyboard. That said, and for various reasons, I am considering the addition of one of the new, M1 powered, Mac Books, and wonder if anyone knows if the latest version of Scrivener Mac is compatible?
Thank you in advance,
Ron

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huntaaar
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Mon Nov 23, 2020 5:43 pm Post

hi

I asked the same thing and got a reply here

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=64019

Ta

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ron777
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Mon Nov 23, 2020 6:51 pm Post

Thank you for your reply.

I am left to assume that "has been tested" means that they'd encountered no issues?

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KB
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Mon Nov 23, 2020 7:57 pm Post

ron777 wrote:Thank you for your reply.

I am left to assume that "has been tested" means that they'd encountered no issues?


Yes. The most recent version (3.2.x) added full Apple Silicon support - in other words, it runs natively on Silicon (M1) machines and not under Rosetta. It's been tested on a developer Silicon machine and works fine. I'm looking forward to my own M1 MacBook Air arriving in the week or so.

All the best,
Keith
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sidderke
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Mon Nov 23, 2020 8:02 pm Post

KB wrote: I'm looking forward to my own M1 MacBook Air arriving in the week or so.


Feel free to report how you like it, I'm very curious of your thoughts.
I sold my iPad Pro, and also have one on order, that would arrive somewhere around the second week of december.

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RuffPub
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Mon Nov 23, 2020 8:10 pm Post

KB wrote:I'm looking forward to my own M1 MacBook Air arriving in the week or so.

All the best,
Keith


Lets us know how you go. I have to wait until Jan 1 to order mine. Chomping at the bit. Unless I suddenly become a successful author and coach :( It will likely be my last computer purchase.

My 2020 16” MBP is fully spec’d and will keep as a ‘desktop’ but want the M1 Air to take on motorhome trip around Aus after my retirement on an already chosen date in 2021.

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ron777
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Mon Nov 23, 2020 9:39 pm Post

KB wrote:
ron777 wrote:Thank you for your reply.

I am left to assume that "has been tested" means that they'd encountered no issues?


Yes. The most recent version (3.2.x) added full Apple Silicon support - in other words, it runs natively on Silicon (M1) machines and not under Rosetta. It's been tested on a developer Silicon machine and works fine. I'm looking forward to my own M1 MacBook Air arriving in the week or so.

All the best,
Keith


Hi Keith,
Thank you.
Ron

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Tue Nov 24, 2020 11:25 am Post

Any good guesses how long third party application developers will support x86_64 architecture? Do we sooner or later need a reversed Rosetta binary translator for running native Apple silicon apps on x86_64 based Mac computers? :D
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georgethegrape
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Tue Nov 24, 2020 8:11 pm Post

Scrivener works perfect on my M1 Macbook Air. I have been using this beast of a machine for about a week now, as I ordered the Mac the day they became available.

This is by far the best computer I have ever owned and there have been no performance issues. Scrivener loads up right away and to be honest, I cannot tell when Rosetta is running or not, even for programs like MS Word. The computer is too fast for it to even make a difference.

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Tue Nov 24, 2020 8:59 pm Post

AnotherGuy wrote:Any good guesses how long third party application developers will support x86_64 architecture? Do we sooner or later need a reversed Rosetta binary translator for running native Apple silicon apps on x86_64 based Mac computers? :D

That's what the Universal app is all about. It'll last until Apple stops supporting the compilation of binaries that work for both architectures. Some developers might continue to use older Xcode compilers to support x86, but others won't or can't. The yearly release of Mac OS versions is something new compared to when "universal app" meant Motorolla/x86 32bit apps, but last time, such universal apps were produced for a 5 year period. But there were limits on how long backwards compatibility was a priority for some developers; it usually didn't extend through a major release that began development after the Mac transitioned to Intel.

So, it really depends, but it could be as long as half a decade if past decisions can be any guide to the future.
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ron777
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Tue Nov 24, 2020 10:07 pm Post

I was about to place an order for a new M1 powered Mac-book Pro, when it had become apparent that Apple will not be shipping until the end of December and possibly the middle of January for the configuration that I had specified, so, no rush to order. May as well wait and see how the early adopters fair with their new Mac-book pro machines.

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AnotherGuy
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Thu Nov 26, 2020 11:53 am Post

rdale wrote:...
The yearly release of Mac OS versions is something new compared to when "universal app" meant Motorolla/x86 32bit apps, but last time, such universal apps were produced for a 5 year period. But there were limits on how long backwards compatibility was a priority for some developers; it usually didn't extend through a major release that began development after the Mac transitioned to Intel.

So, it really depends, but it could be as long as half a decade if past decisions can be any guide to the future.


I have decided that I will wait until most of the third-party software houses will offer native silicon apps for Mac. I am not in a hurry since I have a new Macbook Air i5 2020 and will be using it for at least a couple of years. It is more than fast enough for me, the battery can easily handle an entire work day and it is not heating up in normal use.
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tbrown313
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Fri Nov 27, 2020 5:12 pm Post

I posted my comments about my M1 Mac mini in another thread. I did a quick benchmark if anyone is interested.

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=64082
Terry Brown

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ron777
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Sat Nov 28, 2020 9:16 pm Post

I too had decided to wait for the availability of more native software, but since it has been confirmed that my most used program—Scrivener—runs natively with the M1, I've placed an order for a new MacBookPro. And given my requested configuration, it will not ship until the end of December, but most of my work is performed on an existing desktop, so, no problem.

If anyone is interested, there are several sites that have posted a growing list of software that is either incompatible with the new processor, or requires Rosetta2. It appears that MSFT Office might be on the list of software requiring Rosetta.

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Sat Nov 28, 2020 9:26 pm Post

Can help...if already running Big Sur:

Apple symbol > About this Mac > System Report > Software > Applications >>> list of all applications on the Mac, with a note of whether they are Universal (M1) or Intel