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Re: Font style sheets

Posted: Mon Aug 28, 2017 2:59 am
by LuckyJack
Imagine a document that had code examples or some other format interspersed with the narrative.

In Nisus, I'd use the normal style for the narrative and other styles for the quoted sections, code examples, or whatever.

I can make different style sheet libraries with those named styles, each one formatted differently.

The document appears for print, production, or just plain editing based on which version of the styles I imported.

For example, imagine a document with:

Some paragraphs in italics.

Some paragraphs in bold.

Yet others are bold, italic, and underlined.

If Scrivener used style sheets, I could have StyleA, StyleB, and StyleC instead of those font variations. If I loaded a style sheet library with italic, bold, and bold/underline/italic for StyleA, StyleB, and StyleC, then my project would appear as initially written.

But if I loaded a style sheet that defined StyleA as Arial, StyleB as Courier, and StyleC as Wingdings - none of them italic, bold, or underlined - I would have all of them appear that way instead.

In an editor that supports style sheets, instead of setting some words italic, I could apply the character style "emphatic," using Nisus terminology.

If I wanted to change the italicized words to bold face, it would be one change in the emphatic style, no changes in the document required.

In other words, if you have two different default font/paragraph types in Scrivener, you can't control both separately at compile time.

Style sheets would be really cool. That would put a better boundary between content creation and content appearance.

Maybe I just overthink things, but style sheets are the way to control output formatting, in my opinion. I hope Version 3 supports them.

Re: Font style sheets

Posted: Mon Aug 28, 2017 11:33 pm
by devinganger
We all understand what style sheets are already.

What you may be missing (and that others have tried to explain) is that Scrivener already decouples content from appearance via the Compile mechanism.

You can use the editor to create a project where each document's settings are different (copy and paste text from various Web pages, create your own, etc.). And yes, currently, the editor uses style presets, and this is what will be changing in Scrivener 3, we are told.

You then use Compile to enforce a consistent set of settings across your documents, based on the structure. Compile is what creates your final PDF, DOCX, RTF, etc. You can create multiple custom compile presets as well -- these essentially act as your stylesheet.

With Scrivener today, I can take that disjointed project with all the differently styled documents and create a single, unified set of settings on the output document -- just what a style sheet is supposed to do. I can have different Compile presets created so I can take that same source project and compile it into different settings/styles depending on what my needs are.

*You can already work around the style presets today by learning and using Compile.*

Re: Font style sheets

Posted: Tue Aug 29, 2017 12:36 am
by nontroppo
There are still cases where proper styles in the editor (think of them as consistent semantic containers) could enable a more elegant separation between content and appearance during compile too — Scrivener 3 is getting a proper styles system anyway, so all this should hopefully be a moot point soon... 8)

Re: Font style sheets

Posted: Tue Aug 29, 2017 1:02 am
by devinganger
nontroppo wrote:There are still cases where proper styles in the editor (think of them as consistent semantic containers) could enable a more elegant separation between content and appearance during compile too — Scrivener 3 is getting a proper styles system anyway, so all this should hopefully be a moot point soon... 8)


Agreed. I used to write in DocBook, so that separation in Scrivener is none too firm, but it is there, just in a non-traditional manner. :)