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gotbisco
Posts: 18
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2012 3:22 am
Platform: Mac

Sun Apr 18, 2021 7:42 pm Post

kewms wrote:
drmajorbob wrote:If the project is only text and takes a ling time to open, your machine is abysmally slow or there’s a serious problem of another kind. Even a million words would be not many megabytes.


What he said. Do you have a lot (and I mean a LOT) of snapshots? Are you saving to a USB stick or other relatively slow media (which we don't recommend)?

When you say "a minute" do you mean a literal minute, or does it just seem like a long time because it's an interruption?

Katherine


I don't use snapshots. Usually I have 3-6 projects open, most of them are 90-95% text. Some contain JPGs, one in particular is a bit more image heavy, but the files aren't large. The biggest is a few hundred MB's. The machine is a 2019 MacBook.

To answer your questions: When I accidentally quit and they all save, close down and need to be re-opened, it takes a literal few minutes.

Sure, it's not a huge inconvenience, but it's enough that I'm doing it regularly by accident and if the option was there to turn off one-click quit I'd certainly select that option.

More to the point, and regardless of the file size or the duration of the interruption, it sounds like I'm not the only person who'd find this feature useful.

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drmajorbob
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Sun Apr 18, 2021 7:54 pm Post

gotbisco wrote:I don't use snapshots. Usually I have 3-6 projects open, most of them are 90-95% text. Some contain JPGs, one in particular is a bit more image heavy, but the files aren't large. The biggest is a few hundred MB's. The machine is a 2019 MacBook.

To answer your questions: When I accidentally quit and they all save, close down and need to be re-opened, it takes a literal few minutes.

Sure, it's not a huge inconvenience, but it's enough that I'm doing it regularly by accident and if the option was there to turn off one-click quit I'd certainly select that option.

More to the point, and regardless of the file size or the duration of the interruption, it sounds like I'm not the only person who'd find this feature useful.

A few hundred megabytes is a big project. My 200,000-word project was less than 30 megabytes before removing all the images, and I rarely have more than one project open, never three.

Also check to see if

(a) the images were embedded (dragged directly into) text files

(b) you're in scrivenings mode when you open (that can be slow to open)

(c) if you're including synchronization in the time it takes to close. Sync for the project should be almost instantaneous, since everything but the Binder is already current, but the zip backup is everything. It can take a long time to sync to the cloud (if it's going to a sync service) or an external drive, etc.

I use <$img> tags in the text when I want to include images in the narrative, so that they're not opened until Compile. If the images are directly embedded and you're opening a scrivenings, that will be slooow.

https://www.notion.so/deepspacecorps/Managing-Images-in-Scrivener-c0d536a7edd94d2b81a789f4d4d7d606
Teeth, without gums, fall loosely in the mouth.

(I'm not a Literature & Latte employee. Just another user.)

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gotbisco
Posts: 18
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2012 3:22 am
Platform: Mac

Sun Apr 18, 2021 8:57 pm Post

drmajorbob wrote:
gotbisco wrote:I don't use snapshots. Usually I have 3-6 projects open, most of them are 90-95% text. Some contain JPGs, one in particular is a bit more image heavy, but the files aren't large. The biggest is a few hundred MB's. The machine is a 2019 MacBook.

To answer your questions: When I accidentally quit and they all save, close down and need to be re-opened, it takes a literal few minutes.

Sure, it's not a huge inconvenience, but it's enough that I'm doing it regularly by accident and if the option was there to turn off one-click quit I'd certainly select that option.

More to the point, and regardless of the file size or the duration of the interruption, it sounds like I'm not the only person who'd find this feature useful.

A few hundred megabytes is a big project. My 200,000-word project was less than 30 megabytes before removing all the images, and I rarely have more than one project open, never three.

Also check to see if

(a) the images were embedded (dragged directly into) text files

(b) you're in scrivenings mode when you open (that can be slow to open)

(c) if you're including synchronization in the time it takes to close. Sync for the project should be almost instantaneous, since everything but the Binder is already current, but the zip backup is everything. It can take a long time to sync to the cloud (if it's going to a sync service) or an external drive, etc.

I use <$img> tags in the text when I want to include images in the narrative, so that they're not opened until Compile. If the images are directly embedded and you're opening a scrivenings, that will be slooow.

https://www.notion.so/deepspacecorps/Managing-Images-in-Scrivener-c0d536a7edd94d2b81a789f4d4d7d606


Again, I appreciate all the tips and suggestions for ways to change how I use the application. Perhaps that's information that will be useful to others.

Just to reiterate, this isn't some major bug of the program.

Yet, I know for myself, and it sounds like others as well, a potentially useful feature would be to allow users to go into settings to toggle off the one-click quit. Regardless of file size or image embeds or synching or whatever else--just turning off the ability to quit accidentally would be one I personally would welcome. That's really it. Your experience might differ.

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scrive
Posts: 77
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2020 8:05 am
Platform: Mac

Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:37 pm Post

auxbuss wrote:
Merx wrote:
A macOS app that adds a global delay of 1 second to the Cmd-Q shortcut. In other words, you have to hold down Cmd-Q for 1 second before an application will quit.

https://github.com/dteoh/SlowQuitApps#readme
Nice find. Thanks :-)

I've often accidentally Quit Scrivener, which kicks off a multi-minute backup process due to the extensive reference files (wonderfully organized and available via a Scrivener 'merged' Tab) I need to have available when writing, so thank you for the reference.

However, when I downloaded the app and attempted to open it, I received the following message:
“SlowQuitApps.app” cannot be opened because the developer cannot be verified.
macOS cannot verify that this app is free from malware.

I wonder if the 'SlowQuitApps' application can perhaps be made available via the Apple App Store, or if the app can otherwise be configured so it may be verified as malware free?

scrive
:(
Last edited by scrive on Mon Apr 19, 2021 2:03 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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AmberV
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Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:55 pm Post

If you want to a run a program made by someone that isn't paying Apple's yearly developer tax, you can right-click on it in Applications and select "Open" manually. That should then provide an override dialogue box to run it anyway, and once you do that once it will run normally from that point on. That's at least how it used to work, I don't know as much about macOS 10.15 and 11. They've been locking things down and making it harder to do what you want for years now.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles

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gr
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Tue Apr 20, 2021 3:28 am Post

gotbisco wrote:
devinganger wrote:
AmberV wrote:Yeah, I'd recommend an approach of that nature. It would be very unusual to ask for confirmation on quit, especially in a program that auto-saves like Scrivener.


Maybe a preference (off by default) that allows such a confirmation to be used by people who want it and don't want to remap their key bindings for one program?


That type of option would be terrific.


If you have a key macro program like KeyboardMaestro, you can easily make this function yourself and tie it to cmd-Q when typed in Scriv. That is the way I would do something like this.

gr

Devinganger referred to people who didn’t want to change their key bindings just for one program, but perhaps saying this could be misleading — as though one would be changing it globally but only wanting it for one app. Oh contrare, Apple sys prefs lets you reassign key commands on a per-application basis. And actually, it might some other key command you should change — the one you are always going for that ends up hitting cmd-q instead!
gr : Scrivener user : not affiliated with Lit^Lat
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"Nothing, like something, happens anywhere." —Philip Larkin

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drmajorbob
Posts: 930
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Tue Apr 20, 2021 6:26 am Post

gr wrote:Devinganger referred to people who didn’t want to change their key bindings just for one program, but perhaps saying this could be misleading — as though one would be changing it globally but only wanting it for one app. Oh contrare, Apple sys prefs lets you reassign key commands on a per-application basis. And actually, it might some other key command you should change — the one you are always going for that ends up hitting cmd-q instead!

I tend to reprogram keys I click too easily if they don't do anything I like. I used Karabiner to turn caps-lock into forward-delete. In Keyboard Maestro, I reprogrammed end (of document) to be end of word. I hated accidentally going to the end of my text and having to wander back again.

My Azio keyboard (highly recommended) has F13, F14, and F15 keys. I programmed F14 ->Copy and F15->Paste. I remove newlines in the F14 macro and optionally, if I hit F15 again quickly, the macro inserts .jpg. That's only a few of the customizations, I've done, some globally and some only in Scrivener.

All this started when Ioa suggested Karabiner or something like it for a problem I had.

My favorite thing for Scrivener is hitting ⌥S to get this palette:

palette.jpg
palette.jpg (374.37 KiB) Viewed 112 times


In finder, ⌥F brings up this one:

finder.jpg
finder.jpg (305.19 KiB) Viewed 112 times
Teeth, without gums, fall loosely in the mouth.

(I'm not a Literature & Latte employee. Just another user.)

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drmajorbob
Posts: 930
Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2012 1:38 am
Platform: Mac

Tue Apr 20, 2021 6:28 am Post

drmajorbob wrote:
gr wrote:Devinganger referred to people who didn’t want to change their key bindings just for one program, but perhaps saying this could be misleading — as though one would be changing it globally but only wanting it for one app. Oh contrare, Apple sys prefs lets you reassign key commands on a per-application basis. And actually, it might some other key command you should change — the one you are always going for that ends up hitting cmd-q instead!

I tend to reprogram keys I click too easily if they don't do anything I like. I used Karabiner to turn caps-lock into forward-delete. In Keyboard Maestro, I reprogrammed end (of document) to be end of word. I hated accidentally going to the end of my text and having to wander back again.

My Azio keyboard (highly recommended) has F13, F14, and F15 keys. I programmed F14 ->Copy and F15->Paste. I remove newlines in the F14 macro and optionally, if I hit F15 again quickly, the macro adds .jpg after the selection. That's only a few of the customizations, I've done, some globally and some only in Scrivener.

All this started when Ioa suggested Karabiner or something like it for a problem I had.

My favorite thing for Scrivener is hitting ⌥S to get this palette:

palette.jpg

In finder, ⌥F brings up this one:

finder.jpg
Teeth, without gums, fall loosely in the mouth.

(I'm not a Literature & Latte employee. Just another user.)