How do you add REAL page numbers to ebook compilations?

User avatar
robertdguthrie
Posts: 3075
Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 10:06 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: St. Louis, MO, USA
Contact:

Sat Aug 11, 2012 4:17 pm Post

asotir wrote:By 'goes against the spirit of Scrivener,'

I think a more accurate way of putting it is that the programming effort to do this kind of cross-format page layout/typesetting "falls outside the scope of Scrivener's design". Because you would have to have extremely fine-tuned control over where pagination, hyphenation, justification, and all sorts of other -ations occurred so that you could just hand one file to a printer, and another to the epub & kindle gen routines. You might not need that, but I guarantee you that such a feature would create a huge demand for people who wanted their ebook pages to line up with their CreateSpace output. Rather than focusing on that end of the spectrum, Keith has wisely concentrated on the composition, planning and editing capabilities that make up the core of Scrivener.

With that said, he might look at the problem, see an easy solution for those who just want automatically generated page numbers, and just do it. Perhaps a post to the wish list, with a link to the article I found might spark a new feature. You never know, because the ways of the Keith are quirky. :)
Often wrong, rarely in doubt.
Time for a change... I'm now rdale; same dog-avatar, same dog... channel?

User avatar
AmberV
Posts: 23797
Joined: Sun Jun 18, 2006 4:30 am
Platform: Mac + Linux
Location: Ourense, Galiza
Contact:

Sun Aug 12, 2012 12:00 am Post

I read an interview with Jeff Bezos a few weeks ago. In the course of this interview, Bezos said he was very proud of having added the page numbering to Kindle editions.


I'll admit to not having read up on the concept much, but am I the only one that thinks this whole thing is an awful idea? We use page numbers because books have been traditionally a thick sheaf of thin sheets all glued or sewn together, and it makes it easy to go back to where you were, jot down notes for others, formally cite a work, etc. What could possibly be the point of emulating the numbering system, completely divorced from any actual reason for that numbering system? It's so meaningless, that if I flip through a book on my Kindle, I have to go through multiple screens of text to see a page number change. What's is the use of that?

All right, so one argument is that it lets you interface with paper book readers. But which ones? The ones who are using the hardback, paperback, edition 23 or edition 5? There is a reason why page numbers have never been a reliable referencing system, and that's why we mark down the publisher and year when it is important to find the source again. Except, we don't even get that with Amazon. It's just a mysterious, awfully vague number that describes an arbitrary non-convenient block of text that may or may not work with your friend's paper copy.

And meanwhile if you want to get the actual location for a highlight out of your reader, you have to now jump through hoops because of the system preferring the "page" number. Am I also the only one that likes locations? What's not to like about them? They take you right to where you want to go +/- a few words. You don't even have to mess around with the clunky old "third sentence in paragraph five on page 231" hack that only works if you both have the exact same edition.

Maybe it's the implementation that bothers me. I wouldn't mind if I could ask the reader for the page number for the highlighted phrase in the 2009 Penguin Classics edition. That would be nice and handy, no doubt about it. I have no gripe with that. My gripe is how now my e-book says "Page 325" at the bottom, assuming I want to use this weird irrelevant construct over what has already worked just fine for years now, and that this construct is only relevant to one printed edition in existence, and that edition is undocumented (as far as I know).

I don't know, I'm not speaking "officially" here as L&L opinion. I'm just reading this thread with a bemused look on my face. Trying to coerce "page numbers" into an e-book feels like driving your car around with a riding crop, to me.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles

User avatar
Jaysen
Posts: 6170
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 4:00 am
Platform: Mac + Windows
Location: East-Be-Jesus-Nowhere SC, USA

Sun Aug 12, 2012 12:57 am Post

AmberV wrote:… feels like driving your car around with a riding crop, to me.

Careful. You may get Vic-k's attention.

:)
Jaysen

I have a wife and 2 kids that I can only attribute to a wiggle, a giggle, and the realization that she was out of my league so I might as well be happy with her as a friend. 26 years marriage later, I can't imagine life without her. -Me 10/7/09

Image

User avatar
scottmarmorstein
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2012 10:54 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: PA
Contact:

Sun Aug 12, 2012 12:21 pm Post

AmberV wrote:
All right, so one argument is that it lets you interface with paper book readers. But which ones? The ones who are using the hardback, paperback, edition 23 or edition 5? There is a reason why page numbers have never been a reliable referencing system, and that's why we mark down the publisher and year when it is important to find the source again. Except, we don't even get that with Amazon. It's just a mysterious, awfully vague number that describes an arbitrary non-convenient block of text that may or may not work with your friend's paper copy.


Yeah, I see your point. I hadn't really given it that much thought. :oops:
"It aint why, it just is." -Van Morrison