I find the word "whilst" exceedingly annoying...

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thewolfgang
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Fri Jan 09, 2009 3:18 pm Post

What about transpire and exacerbate?

To quote Keith, "Huh? HUH?"

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KB
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Fri Jan 09, 2009 3:35 pm Post

Unlike the eminent KB, I did have to suffer the indignities of an, albeit very minor, public school.


I should add here, in case my previous hasty remarks about "posh public schools" came across as inverted snobbishness towards such institutions on my part, that now I'm actually at a stage in life where it may be possible, I'm considering sending my own kids to such a place. It may never happen, and it galls me too given that I've spent the last ten years mocking my wife-to-be for being a hoity-toity privately educated type. :)

All the best,
Keith

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Fri Jan 09, 2009 3:50 pm Post

I've been married seventeen years, KB, and I must advise you: DO NOT MOCK THE WIFE-TO-BE!

For any reason. You will regret it whilst ( :mrgreen: ) you comtemplate your shame one day. Make her laugh, to be sure, but no mockery.
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p a t r i c k
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Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:19 pm Post

I like "whilst" and there is nothing old fashioned about it. It is in widespread use in the UK.

I do like "methinks" a lot and use it myself. Unlike "whilst", "methinks" is considered old English. I'm a sort of one man campaign to rehabilitate "methinks".

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Fri Jan 09, 2009 8:47 pm Post

p a t r i c k wrote:I do like "methinks" a lot and use it myself. Unlike "whilst", "methinks" is considered old English. I'm a sort of one man campaign to rehabilitate "methinks".


And I've been on a one woman crusade to rehabilitate, connexion, into standard parlance! It's such a pity to lose any spelling variant that includes the letter 'x'.
.:.
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Fri Jan 09, 2009 8:49 pm Post

AmberV wrote:And I've been on a one woman crusade to rehabilitate, connexion, into standard parlance! It's such a pity to lose any spelling variant that includes the letter 'x'.


Ooh, I would join that one.

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Fri Jan 09, 2009 9:02 pm Post

Whilst is cool.
And if it annoys a Canuck even cooler.

I thought flautist was a sexual term, my horizons are obviously getting expanded on this forum.

A word that should be taken out and crucified is "notwithstanding."
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Fri Jan 09, 2009 9:20 pm Post

Every Brit friend I have uses whilst. It was strange at first, but being in touch with English-speaking folks around the world, I've gotten used to the little oddities and differences.

Now the big question is, for the word 'aunt' do you say 'ant' or 'awnt'? Do you say tomahto, while I say tomayto? You say potayto and I say potahto?

Is it soft or hard 'g' for genmaicha, as in the tea? It's followed by an 'e,' but many use a hard 'g' nevertheless.

These things are very important and I think we should all decide and speak in exactly the same manner or surely chaos will ensue and we will all die. :shock:

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Fri Jan 09, 2009 9:31 pm Post

A few years ago, I noticed that my journalism students were all using "amidst" instead of "amid." In best Occam/ Strunk & White fashion, I prefer the simpler of two options, and that extra "-st" somehow sounded a bit ... affected, I guess, coming from American students. OTOH having different ways to say something provides writers with more variations -- more colors in the palette. I guess it depends on context, and in most American contexts, the "st" probably sounds affected to me.

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Fri Jan 09, 2009 9:42 pm Post

Thequietone wrote:I thought flautist was a sexual term,

You`re mixing it up with, 'flauntist'. Katherine, Pink and Alexandria, are three obvious examples that spring immediately to mind. Most flauntists are female.
Thequietone wrote:my horizons are obviously getting expanded on this forum

Your horizons have plenty of scope for expansion, and your standards raising, notwithstanding the depths to which they have heretofore bottomed out. :shock:
As a professional, you, are your one and only asset. Without integrity you are worthless, but with it, you are priceless.

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p a t r i c k
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Fri Jan 09, 2009 9:51 pm Post

I grew up in Northern Ireland which for the most part speaks English.

Some of the English words used in Northern Ireland are quite unique to the province.

Studies have shown that many of these unique words date from the 16th and 17th centuries.

One word I remember very well that I used as a child, "mitch", "mitcher" and "mitching" for truancy was used for this purpose in 16th century.

I don't know if that word is still in use by Northern Irish schoolchildren today, but I think it might well be.

The above information comes from a BBC Radio Four documentary methinks, so it must be true.

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Fri Jan 09, 2009 11:21 pm Post

Your horizons have plenty of scope for expansion, and your standards raising, notwithstanding the depths to which they have heretofore bottomed out.

I resemble those remarks. I have yet to bottom out.
There is yet a long way to go. Notwithstanding.

Paul

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Fri Jan 09, 2009 11:43 pm Post

vic-k wrote:Katherine, Pink and Alexandria, are three obvious examples that spring immediately to mind. Most flauntists are female.


If you got it, flaunt it!!!! :twisted:
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Sat Jan 10, 2009 12:46 am Post

I always wanted the word "vex" to come back into fashion, as I always loved it coming from the mouths of 19th century literary heroines: "Oh that gentleman really has rather vexed me," declared Charlotte Honeybee. Unfortunately the word "vex" has come back into fashion, but it's not quite the same coming from the mouths of South East London hoodies: "You is vexin' me, innit?" *Sigh*

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Sat Jan 10, 2009 1:57 am Post

KB wrote:I should add here, in case my previous hasty remarks about "posh public schools" came across as inverted snobbishness towards such institutions on my part, that now I'm actually at a stage in life where it may be possible, I'm considering sending my own kids to such a place. It may never happen, and it galls me too given that I've spent the last ten years mocking my wife-to-be for being a hoity-toity privately educated type.

I assure you, Keith, that my institution of internment on the North Downs was anything but posh. But many people, especially the citizens of Catford, Lewisham and thereabouts, think my accent posh and a substantial number would be happy to beat me up because of it!
And I wouldn't recommend a boarding-school to anyone!!!

AmberV wrote:And I've been on a one woman crusade to rehabilitate, connexion, into standard parlance! It's such a pity to lose any spelling variant that includes the letter 'x'.

I'm with you there ... and have always been irritated with myself for allowing others to educate me out of spelling it like that. I do get to use the X on my keyboard a considerable amount of the time, living in a city whose name begins with it ... even if it is pronounced more like /hs/!

alexwein wrote:Is it soft or hard 'g' for genmaicha, as in the tea? It's followed by an 'e,' but many use a hard 'g' nevertheless.

If I have a "button" for extreme irritation, it is pressed by people who make no effort even to approximate the pronunciation of words in foreign languages* ... that has to be a hard 'g'**, it could not be anything else. But I think I should do something about that response, as not everyone has had the experience of living round the world and in many language environments that I have.

But here in Xiamen, on the other side of the river mouth there is a district called "Haicang" — 'c' is the pinyin romanisation for the phoneme /ts/ in Mandarin. One problem is that speakers of southern dialects confuse a number of sounds in Mandarin, noticeably substituting /t∫/ for /ts/ and /s/ for /∫/ — the latter means you have to listen carefully because 4 is /sə/ and 10 is /∫ə/ both with a very short vowel and local speakers pronounce them both /sə/, though with a tone difference — so local people speaking putonghua (Mandarin) will pronounce it /hait∫aŋ/ and those whom come from somewhere north of the Yangtze — 50% of the residents of Xiamen have immigrated from other parts of China — and the well-educated pronounce it with the standard /haitsaŋ/. The ones who press my button and who I'd like to throw off Haicang Bridge, are the many westerners who pronounce it randomly, sometimes using both pronunciations in the same sentence. To me, that is a level of arrogance towards their host country that I find hard to take. It's not as if it's difficult to find out how it should be pronounced, or at least to be consistent.

Yours with his dander up.

Mark

[Edit]* This is not a go at you Alex, as I'm sure that wouldn't apply to you. But I know many, many people, not least here in Xiamen, who make no real effort ... including those here who make no effort to pronounce Xiamen properly! Those are the ones I mean.

** Just thought I ought to check the pronunciation of that, it's actually "xuanmaicha" in Chinese, so it's been transcribed from some other dialect ... I've just asked my cleaning lady and it's "suan…" in Minnanhua. So it's probably the Japanese pronunciation. Japanese has /ʤ/ but only as an allomorph of /d/ or /z/ before /i/, not /e/, so I still think it should be /gen/ with a hard 'g'.
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