Your worst film adaptation ...

User avatar
kewms
Posts: 5541
Joined: Fri Feb 02, 2007 5:22 pm
Platform: Mac

Tue May 06, 2008 3:38 pm Post

Books and movies are different. In my experience, the worse adaptations are the ones that are too faithful to the book, leaving no room for the difference between media.

Katherine
Scrivener Support Team

Hu
Hugh
Posts: 2444
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:05 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: UK

Tue May 06, 2008 3:51 pm Post

Love in the Time of Cholera
'Listen, some quiet night, when you've shirked your work that day. Do you hear
that distant, almost inaudible clicking sound? That's one of your
competitors, working away in the night in
Paris or London or Erie, PA.'

Hu
Hugh
Posts: 2444
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:05 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: UK

Tue May 06, 2008 4:31 pm Post

Captain Corelli's Mandolin
'Listen, some quiet night, when you've shirked your work that day. Do you hear
that distant, almost inaudible clicking sound? That's one of your
competitors, working away in the night in
Paris or London or Erie, PA.'

User avatar
KB
Site Admin
Posts: 20718
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 11:23 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: Truro, Cornwall
Contact:

Tue May 06, 2008 5:25 pm Post

Oh God, Captain Corelli's Mandolin. Nic Cage as a tall, skinny and dashing Italian? Penelope Cruz (Spanish) as the meek, voluptuous and beautiful Pelagia (Greek)? William Hurt as... Oh God. Please make it stop. I've never even watched it. Just the "my-a love-a knows-a a-no bounds-a" adverts had me crying into my lovely blue and beige paperback. Just please. Make. It. Stop. What is the point of Nicolas Cage anyway? Brilliant in Raising Arizona, Honeymoon in Vegas etc - i.e. comedy dumb-average man - but Leaving Las Vegas turned him into something he most definitely is not. Captain Corelli's Mandolin. Bloody hell.

User avatar
Jacqi Corgan
Posts: 395
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:09 am
Location: Akron, Ohio, USA

Tue May 06, 2008 5:39 pm Post

Ouch. Cage's performance in "Moonstruck" came to mind, and segued into the twin concepts of miscasting and off-key directing. They're the reason I wasn't fond of Hurt in "Jane Eyre," or Kevin Costner in "Robin Hood."
A scrivener using Scrivener. (Credit to xiamenese! :) )

Hu
Hugh
Posts: 2444
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:05 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: UK

Tue May 06, 2008 6:53 pm Post

KB wrote:Oh God, Captain Corelli's Mandolin. Nic Cage as a tall, skinny and dashing Italian? Penelope Cruz (Spanish) as the meek, voluptuous and beautiful Pelagia? William Hurt as... Oh God. Please make it stop. I've never even watched. Just the "my-a love-a knows-a a-no bounds-a" adverts had me crying into my lovely blue and beige paperback. Just please. Make. It. Stop. What is the point of Nicolas Cage anyway? Brilliant in Raising Arizona, Honeymoon in Vegas etc - i.e. comedy dumb-average man - but Leaving Las Vegas turned him into something he most definitely is not. Captain Corelli's Mandolin. Bloody hell.


KB, Agreed, although I credit Cage with doing all that was required of him in Adaptation (at least up until the last half-hour, which wasn't his fault anyway).

P.S. And I guess one has to concede that as the nephew of Franicis Ford Coppola and son of August, he must have plenty of Italian genes somewhere. Just nowhere that can convince an audience that he actually is Italian. :) What is the point of him? Anything like Con-Air?
'Listen, some quiet night, when you've shirked your work that day. Do you hear
that distant, almost inaudible clicking sound? That's one of your
competitors, working away in the night in
Paris or London or Erie, PA.'

me
melmoth2
Posts: 41
Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 10:35 pm

Tue May 06, 2008 7:04 pm Post

The remake of the Time Machine. A completely wasted opportunity made all the worse by the fact that H.G. Wells' great-grandson Simon Wells co-produced it. What on earth was Jeremy Irons' Uber-Morlock all about? It just turned the film into yet another witless Hollywood special effects parade with a cartoon villain at the end. George Pal's first version was much, much better.

User avatar
kewms
Posts: 5541
Joined: Fri Feb 02, 2007 5:22 pm
Platform: Mac

Tue May 06, 2008 8:16 pm Post

I'm even a Nick Cage fan. Loved him in Raising Arizona and Honeymoon in Vegas. Very good in Guarding Tess and The Grifters. Clearly I should skip this one if I want to continue to be a fan.

Katherine
Scrivener Support Team

Hu
Hugh
Posts: 2444
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:05 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: UK

Wed May 07, 2008 8:42 am Post

kewms wrote:I'm even a Nick Cage fan. Loved him in Raising Arizona and Honeymoon in Vegas. Very good in Guarding Tess and The Grifters. Clearly I should skip this one if I want to continue to be a fan.

Katherine


I recommend you make your own assessment. I suspect there was a degree of chauvinism in the British reception: favourite Brit novel, Brit production company, Brit director with good Brit track record, all rendered sub-prime because of failings of big Hollywood star who - it was speculated, I've no idea if it was true - was "only" required to participate by the Hollywood money. But even so, it was wrong for him, and he was all wrong for the movie.

H
'Listen, some quiet night, when you've shirked your work that day. Do you hear
that distant, almost inaudible clicking sound? That's one of your
competitors, working away in the night in
Paris or London or Erie, PA.'

User avatar
werebear
Posts: 227
Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 5:30 pm
Location: ADK Mountains
Contact:

Thu May 08, 2008 2:30 am Post

I know a lot of people loved the movie, but The English Patient was so much more stunning as a book.

I'm sure, like most readers, we approach a movie with trepidation, but a low water mark was reached when one of Lawrence Block's Burglar books was made into a movie with Whoopi Goldberg as Bernie Rhodenbarr.

It's something akin to casting Gwyneth Paltrow as Mohammed Ali.
WereBear

A work in progress...

http://wayofcats.com/blog

Tr
Tripper
Posts: 247
Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:33 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: UK

Thu May 08, 2008 10:49 am Post

werebear wrote:a low water mark was reached when one of Lawrence Block's Burglar books was made into a movie with Whoopi Goldberg as Bernie Rhodenbarr.


I love those Bernie Rhodenbarr books. Whoopi Goldberg! What were they thinking?
The person who says it can't be done should not interrupt the person doing it.

User avatar
Wock
Posts: 2540
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2007 8:09 pm
Location: Gallatin, Tennessee (USA)
Contact:

Thu May 08, 2008 4:46 pm Post

The Bourne Triliogy
(The Bourne Identity, The Bourne Supremacy, The Bourne Ultimatium).

Two scenes in the first movie followed the books. From then on out the only thing they shared with the books were some of the character names.

The story, the plots, the characters, the roles, and even the scenes were nothing like the books at all. The final outcomes and even the character deaths were completely different.

The movies were so loosely based on the books they just used the main idea and character names and rewrote the hole story from scratch.

Boo

(The Books were so much better)
The wheel is turning but the hamster is still dead.

User avatar
KB
Site Admin
Posts: 20718
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 11:23 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: Truro, Cornwall
Contact:

Thu May 08, 2008 5:14 pm Post

I recommend you make your own assessment. I suspect there was a degree of chauvinism in the British reception...


!! Now hang on a minute, if that were true, everybody would have hated Bridget Jones' Diary, too, given that it was a favourite British book etc etc and they brought in a big Hollywood start to play the role of Jones. But Renee Zellweger - who up until then had annoyed the heck out of me (her entire acting repertoire in that abysmal "Show me the money" film with Tom Cruise consisted of tilting her head and furrowing her brow) - was (apologies for the long and nested parentheses a moment ago) fantastic in it. It has nothing to do with "British chauvinism". To cast Nic Cage as Corelli and Penelope Cruz (brilliant in some other things - though mainly her Spanish films) as Pelagia was just a joke. Cage was too old, bald and lacking in the particular type of charisma required for the role, and Cruz was too stick-thin (and it also seems silly having a Spanish actress speaking English pretending to be Greek, but that sort of thing is par for the course).

In cases such as this, I always think of the superb Comic Strip production, Strike!, a mockumentary about the making of a Hollywood film about the eighties' miners' strikes across Britain. Arthur Scargill is played by Al Pacino and renamed "Arthur Scarface", the UK is shown as cobbled streets and buck-toothed idiots, and the whole thing ends with a motorbike chase to the houses of parliament. Brilliant.

What about Gwynneth Paltrow as Emma, too? Everybody liked that (Hollywood actress, British beloved book). I even enjoyed Spielberg's War of the Worlds despite the fact that it relocated everything to the US etc. Baz Luhrman's Romeo + Juliet? Superb. Etc, etc. See, we're not chauvinists. We're just discerning. :)

User avatar
Jacqi Corgan
Posts: 395
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:09 am
Location: Akron, Ohio, USA

Thu May 08, 2008 6:21 pm Post

KB wrote:See, we're not chauvinists. We're just discerning. :)

Thank God somebody is!
A scrivener using Scrivener. (Credit to xiamenese! :) )

User avatar
vic-k
Posts: 7135
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2007 8:23 am
Platform: Mac + Windows
Location: Protesting in the nude, outside ex Red Lion TESCO Store

Thu May 08, 2008 6:45 pm Post

In the late 70s whilst working night shift, there were always hundreds of books lying around, or available for borrowing. I picked up one and didn`t stop until I`d finished. It was the most gripping and scariest piece of writing I`d ever read...and still is.

When, a while latter, it was released as a movie, I felt as happy as a dog with two ding-a-lings, and as sick as a bear with a sore arse, when I realised it had done the rounds at the cinemas, and I`d missed it.

With the benefit of wisdom acquired over 63 years, it has just dawned on me that this post isn`t realy what this thread is about, but... Eventually it was shown on TV. Now this is where I go of topic...I`m bad!!I know I am!! I can`t help it, I`m a congenital off-toppicker As a movie I found it, in every way just as rewarding an experience, as reading the book. However, I have since come to wonder, recently, whether or not the book was an adaptation of the story/screenplay by Dan O`Bannon, Ronald Shusssett and David Giler. The Book/Movie was `Alien`.

I would seriously (nearly choked on that!!) appreciate the opinions of the more critically astute members of the crew, on this matter. `k you, :D

Take care
Vic
As a professional, you, are your one and only asset. Without integrity you are worthless, but with it, you are priceless.