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Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 1:21 pm
by PJS
Jaysen wrote:Who really needs a keyboard in that world?


Could come in handy for those of us whose aging or otherwise debilitated vocal cords provide erratic output — and sometimes, none at all.

ps

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 1:29 pm
by yosimiti
Part of the pleasure of writing is that it is a tactile experience. Sometimes, I honestly think I feel the words in my fingers, and not in my head when I write. If any of you have had that out-of-mind experience, you know what I mean. That hasn't changed since folks began chiseling their thoughts on tablets (the stone variety, not ones made by Apple and the like) eons ago. Such an experience is lost with dictation I feel. But perhaps I'm being a little nostalgic. I dunno...

ANYWAYS...

if they develop a touchscreen keyboard that can:

1. give you a DYNAMIC feedback, to indicate and reciprocate THE PRESSURE you've pressed your particular letter pressed
2. Evolve the current layout so that the letters are more ergonomically placed (perhaps a curved layout as opposed to a linear one)
3. make it pressure sensitive so that when you press hard, you get additional options for the letter (caps, accents, grave, symbols, etc)


...I think the benefits might actually outweigh the drawbacks. I wouldn't mind trying to type on this setup when technology advances enough

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 2:25 pm
by vic-k
PJS wrote: aging or otherwise debilitated vocal cords provide erratic output —
or, even, typoesque erotica!! :shock: :oops:

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 4:02 pm
by ptram
yosimiti wrote:make it pressure sensitive so that when you press hard, you get additionally options for the letter (caps, accents, grave, symbols, etc)

Hum... Isn't this already there, both in iOS and the Mac?

Paolo

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 4:11 pm
by gr
Well, it is press and hold (and hence universal) rather than force press, but definitely there!

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 5:04 pm
by yosimiti
I mean pressure sensitive with more than just two levels of pressure (hard and soft); something that imitates how you press keys. You don't just press them hard or soft. Sometimes you press them really softly, and likewise really hard. If you're going to make haptic feedback imitate the experience of a keyboard, the pressure experience needs to by dynamic, and not just a binary (hard vs soft).

This is certainly something for the future.

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 5:51 pm
by JimRac
Jaysen wrote:
rdale wrote:But the idea that we'll all be typing on glass in the near future is ludicrous. You have to have some tactile feedback to tell that your fingers are still on the home row, and that you tapped the right key. Only a physical keyboard can provide that. The proliferation of tablet keyboard cases is evidence enough, for me, that we're not headed into a Star Trek TNG interface nightmare.

if you look at the real end point for TNG, there was no "typing". It is was all "control interface" all txt input was spoken. That is what i predict. More voice recognition with less actual text and more direct recording of vocal/visual for person to person and post recording voice recognition for voice to text requirements.

Who really needs a keyboard in that world?


Because iOSScriv is so friggin' awesome, last week I dove into the Apple world, and bought an iPad Air 2, a folding keyboard, and a 360 case (can position the iPad horizontally or vertically).

I have never used an iPad before, and played around with everything.

I was shocked at how well Apple's speech recognition works, particularly with iOSScriv.

I have no doubt that I will continue writing & editing via typing, but I also foresee wearing my bluetooth headset and dictating first drafts to iOSScriv.

Jim

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Mon Sep 05, 2016 1:48 pm
by yosimiti
Looks like touchscreen keyboards are already starting to be made:

http://www.cnet.com/products/lenovo-yoga-book/preview/

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 8:16 pm
by Maritimer
I've been writing for seven months, a total of 508,349 characters on a Logitech K800 keyboard https://www.logitech.com/en-ca/product/ ... board-k800 . That's around 300 keypresses per finger per day. Now I'm getting a painful sensation in my fingertips with every keypress.

The keys have a resistance that suddenly gives way at a certain force. Then that force propels the finger unrestricted into the bottom of the keystroke. There isn't any absorption of the energy--you end up hammering the base of the keyboard at the end of every keystroke. When I really get going, I'm sure I use much more force than is required.

I ordered the Matias Mini Quiet Pro keyboard last night. Hope the keys are better.

Has anyone else had this problem develop in their fingertips?

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 6:27 pm
by Piglet907
serpententacle wrote:http://www.qwerkywriter.com/?variant=1045405359

BOOM!


Oh my, this looks fantastic!

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Wed Aug 01, 2018 10:09 pm
by ptram
I've been using Das Keyboards for years. I've now two 4C, that they no longer make, and that I think are the best keyboard ever conceived and produced.
Excellent precision, tactile feel, auditive response, build robustness, size.

Paolo

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2018 6:44 am
by brett
I’ve used the same set up for years. My old Apple Wireless keyboard, which I used to use with my MacBooks, is now the primary keyboard with my iPad Pro, often using my old Incase Origami keyboard case/ipad stand or (when at a desk) with the iPad boosted up near eye level by one of those little cheap folding tablet/phone stands. I really like it, but I found the constant pairing and re-pairing between my iPad and MacBook so tedious that now I just use the Macbook Pro’s own keyboard when it’s plugged into my cinema display. That 2015 vintage keyboard feels very similar to the Wireless Keyboard, which prevents typos due to constant switching back between different keyboard styles.

When I’m on the road or at a library, instead of the Apple keyboard, I’ll tote my ipad Pro and Logitech keys to go, which is light, thin and above all silent, very necessary when taking notes in a library or concert or lecture. But as much as I like it for note taking, I don’t recommend it for extensive typing. When I used it for hours at a time, I noticed some forearm pain, maybe due to its flatness?

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Thu Aug 02, 2018 4:22 pm
by ptram
I've not used it much (not had long holidays, yet!), but when going aroind with only the iPad I also carry with me a Perixx Periboard 805 II foldable keyboard (after having used for a little the previous version). It's small, opens to a full size, has the same typining feeling as the old Apple Wireless Keyboard (never tried the new one with the non-removable battery).

http://perixx.com/catalog/product/view/ ... tegory/15/

It pairs immediately, and works immediately. My only issue is with iOS' lack of customizable keyboard layouts, forcing me to use a TextExpander set to simulate a modified Italian QZERTY layout. If was not for this, it could be the perfect typing combo while on the move).

Paolo

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 6:35 pm
by JimRac
ptram wrote:I've not used it much (not had long holidays, yet!), but when going aroind with only the iPad I also carry with me a Perixx Periboard 805 II foldable keyboard (after having used for a little the previous version). It's small, opens to a full size, has the same typining feeling as the old Apple Wireless Keyboard (never tried the new one with the non-removable battery).

http://perixx.com/catalog/product/view/ ... tegory/15/

It pairs immediately, and works immediately. My only issue is with iOS' lack of customizable keyboard layouts, forcing me to use a TextExpander set to simulate a modified Italian QZERTY layout. If was not for this, it could be the perfect typing combo while on the move).

Paolo

I also use the Perixx 805 II for travelling, and love it for that purpose.

I've just put in 4 weeks and 30k+ words on a Filco Majestouch MINILA Air 67 Key Tactile Action Bluetooth Keyboard, with Cherry MX Brown switches.

The name they gave the keyboard is bigger than the thing itself!

I write first drafts in HanxWriter (then copy to iOS Scrivener), and this is now my main keyboard for that purpose. It is a great bluetooth-only mechanical keyboard with a small footprint. It is significantly smaller than a typical full size, see the comparison at the Diatec site linked below, but it is solid and has suprising heft and weight. Takes 2x AA batteries - the rechargeables that I put in 4x weeks ago are still going. Bluetooth connection with my iPad is solid. I cannot detect any latency.

The feel of the Cherry MX Browns combined with the audio (via headphones) from HanxWriter's typewriter simulation is a beautiful thing. The physical act of writing is always a pleasure now, even in the midst of struggling with a scene. :)

Only downside of this keyboard is that the right shift key is half size. You can see it in the photos at the URL's below. This was done so they could squeeze in arrow and delete keys on the right. It was initally annoying--that is a theme of the Amazon reviews--but ultimately I am okay with this design compromise, as having the arrow & delete keys easily accessible balances out the small shift. I have zero issues with it now, gotta love muscle memory. YMMV.

http://www.diatec.co.jp/en/det.php?prod_c=1468

Note: the photos at the Amazon page indicate a cable, which is not accurate. This keyboard is bluetooth only.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00F3V81VG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Cheers,
Jim

Re: Writing Keyboards

Posted: Wed Apr 17, 2019 8:35 am
by BrittanyAustin
I am using the Corsair K70 Rapidfire RGB, which is a budget gaming keyboard with Cherry MX red switches. I don't need all the fancy lighting effects, so the Corsair Strafe cherry red with red backlight is perfect. It feels the same as the K70, but it works more. Not too loud. I like this keyboard, even if it is typing. It has a very strong construction quality, although not like my K70 Rapidfire. That is made of aluminum, and this is absolutely all plastic. It still has some weight but feels solid.