And the Iphone is as good as I thought.

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wmarcy
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Sat Jun 30, 2007 10:17 am Post

3 hours waiting in line, but am now going through all the wonderful things it can do.

Full write up later.

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arashi
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Sun Jul 01, 2007 12:46 am Post

I’m holding off on the iPhone now, but I will definitely buy one later on.

I followed much of the hype during the week and the many videos and reports of actual purchase last night. One thing stands above all other impressions. I was totally taken by Apple’s policy to have all store employees—200 strong at the main Apple store in NYC, for example—applaud as customers quick-marched into the store, typically 20 at a time, after standing in line for hours, in some cases days. What a superb little P.R. touch to acknowledge the value of the Apple customer and to etch in his or her memory forever the magic of the moment, the ecstatic thrill of clutching the “designer’sâ€
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AmberV
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Sun Jul 01, 2007 2:17 am Post

But I wish every single cellular tower in the entire world were to somehow, irreversibly contract a fungus which causes them all to disintegrate into a fine powder. Attempts to ever reconstruct the cellular network would find this rampant fungus ready to bombard further constructions.

I think the mobile phone might possibly be the most damaging invention ever unleashed upon the public. Yes, even worse than cigarettes, fast food, and fundamentalist christianity.

Devices like this iPhone, meant to sex up the concept... well, I like Apple, but I hope this whole cellular phone thing of theirs ultimately falls just flat enough to make them refocus on the important Apple things, rather than all of these oxymoronic "lifestyle" things they have been wasting their time on.

--
SourGrumpyLudditeAmber, signing off.

AJ
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Sun Jul 01, 2007 2:20 am Post

arashi, I can understand your being taken with the store employees' applause if you enjoy it as a form of theatre. As someone who used to be involved in the production of theatre, I find it hard to forget that the store employees are being paid to simulate spontaneous enthusiasm.
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Sun Jul 01, 2007 3:02 am Post

wmarcy,

I'll look forward to your review. Mine's on order (through the Apple Store) but I won't get it for a couple of weeks, apparently. :cry:

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Sun Jul 01, 2007 3:56 am Post

3 reasons NOT to buy an iPhone, with AT&T service

1. AT&T is the USA's second largest political donor. Since 1990, they have donated 56% of their funds to Republicans and 44% to Democrats.

2. In 2006, they allowed the NSA to monitor all of their customer phone/internet records without warrants.

3. On June 21, 2006, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that AT&T had rewritten rules on their privacy policy. The policy, to take effect June 23, 2006, says that "AT&T — not customers — owns customers' confidential info and can use it 'to protect its legitimate business interests, safeguard others, or respond to legal process."

So, if you use AT&T, be prepared to sacrifice your privacy and to support right-wing candidates.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AT%26T

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arashi
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Sun Jul 01, 2007 8:04 am Post

AmberV wrote:But I wish every single cellular tower in the entire world were to somehow, irreversibly contract a fungus which causes them all to disintegrate into a fine powder. Attempts to ever reconstruct the cellular network would find this rampant fungus ready to bombard further constructions.

I'm not clear how cellular towers are a fungus. Visual blight?

arashi
Everybody is in his own dream. The discrepancies that exist between the dreams are the problem. — Kodo Sawaki

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arashi
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Sun Jul 01, 2007 8:08 am Post

AJ wrote:arashi, I can understand your being taken with the store employees' applause if you enjoy it as a form of theatre. As someone who used to be involved in the production of theatre, I find it hard to forget that the store employees are being paid to simulate spontaneous enthusiasm.

I agree, the applause is theatre. And yes, these are paid employees following instructions from management on top, maybe even Steve Jobs himself.

Here are two points:

1. Has anybody in this forum ever been applauded as they walked into a store to make a significant purchase? Applauded by 60 to 200 staff? From the standpoint of sales promotion, pure genius.

2. So what if the paid staff is acting as if they care? Does motive really make a difference? I’ve applauded at birthday parties for people I didn’t know, didn’t care about. I’ve said nice things at weddings to people I didn’t know, didn’t care about. I’ve thanked people as a courtesy for giving a speech that threatened to put me to sleep. I thanked them for their effort. I’ve complimented a friend when he showed me a new car I would never chose to own. The key thing is the act, the moment of acknowledgment, the moment of showing respect. It is the human touch, which in the flash of a moment, adds to the enjoyment of walking in to buy an iPhone. Assessing whether the applause is genuine or insincere misses the mark. I’m sure that the iPhone customers would admit the applause was part of a planned retail strategy. But the moment they walked into store, the applause was very real and powerful. The emotional effect lingers even though the head says it was simply PR. That’s called good human relations.

arashi
Everybody is in his own dream. The discrepancies that exist between the dreams are the problem. — Kodo Sawaki

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KB
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Sun Jul 01, 2007 8:19 am Post

AmberV wrote:Posted: 01 Jul 2007 02:17 am Post subject:
But I wish every single cellular tower in the entire world were to somehow, irreversibly contract a fungus which causes them all to disintegrate into a fine powder. Attempts to ever reconstruct the cellular network would find this rampant fungus ready to bombard further constructions.


Lol. I have to agree. I have to say that the iPhone is a product for which I have had next-to-zero enthusiasm and anticipation. I hate mobile phones. (Caveat: I do, somewhat reluctantly, own one: my better half's cast-off with a pay-as-you-go Virgin SIM. It is, however, rarely switched on and its main purpose is to ensure that if there are any emergencies or problems with my children I have a way of finding out quickly.)

I hate the way when I go into a newsagent's shop to buy the paper or a snack, the guy behind the counter doesn't even acknowledge me or even both to say thanks because he is to busy chatting away on his mobile phone. (He just points to the price on the till and hands out his hand.)

I hate the way I can't sit on a train any more and just read a book without being forced to hear the bellowed halves of asinine and tedious conversations that would have been better off never uttered.

I hate the way I can't sit and read on a bus any more because chavs use their mobile phones to blast out tinny rap music.

I hate the way I think the man sitting opposite me is trying to talk to me only to realise he is using a hands-free device whilst staring me out.

I hate the way the children in my class can't spell because they are used to contractions from text messages (ok m8?).

Grammatically speaking, the only good thing to have emerged from mobile phone use is the wider use of present tense. As in: "I am standing in a shop." "I am sitting on the bus." "I am walking down the street." In a quieter time, such utterances would only have emanated from the mouth of a village idiot who felt compelled to announce his every action. Nowadays, such phrases can commonly be heard emanating from the widening mouth-holes of those with mobile phones glued to their ears. Which only goes to show that mobile phones are making village idiots of us all...

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Keith

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Sun Jul 01, 2007 9:03 am Post

Which only goes to show that mobile phones are making village idiots of us all...

Ditto. Though mobile web access via the iPhone is appealing to me. Phone off — web on.

Tim
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between theory and practice.
In practice, there is.

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Sun Jul 01, 2007 9:23 am Post

KB wrote:I hate the way when I go into a newsagent's shop to buy the paper or a snack, the guy behind the counter doesn't even acknowledge me or even both to say thanks because he is to busy chatting away on his mobile phone...


Ha! An excellent rant Keith; appreciate the anaphora. I’ll warrant (note the contraction and tense) that your invitation to appear alongside the likes of Arthur Smith, Alan Coren and Rick Wakeman is already in the post. The next series of “Grumpy Old Menâ€
Can't write right. Don't care neither. Er...either.

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Typo
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Sun Jul 01, 2007 10:59 am Post

KB wrote:I hate the way the children in my class can't spell because they are used to contractions from text messages (ok m8?).


Back in the 80s my teacher thought the same of me when I wrote something in C=64 Basic ... :D

I can only say, I'm the perfect customer for this thingy. Really, I could travel much lighter, because iPhone would be carried instead of my mobile phone, mobile internet device, Palm, iPod and PSP. Yes, I like gadgets. :)

And don't forget - it will be the best eBook reader that's out there ...

AJ
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Sun Jul 01, 2007 11:02 am Post

KB wrote:I hate the way I can't sit on a train any more and just read a book without being forced to hear the bellowed halves of asinine and tedious conversations that would have been better off never uttered.

I love the way people reveal themselves on trains, as if they don't know or don't care that their voices can travel the width of an aisle. I've heard businessmen reveal takeover plans and who's going to go. I've heard schoolboys talk about leaving home and schoolgirls talk about what doofuses their boyfriends are. I've heard twenty-six-year-olds hitting on fourteen-year-olds who chat about how much their foster mother drinks. I couldn't imagine some of the things I've overheard on trains. I don't need to invent characters; I just need to open my ears.

Cheers!
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Sun Jul 01, 2007 11:05 am Post

My Lord Keith, My Lady AmberV
I hope the village idiot my Lord refers to in his post, isn`t `yours truly`, after my post to Lady Alexandria, referring to my penchant for walking around the village, whilst talking into my homemade cardboard iPhone. I know in my heart, that my Lord would not be so cruel...would he?

Unfortunately for You, my Lord and Lady (I am blessed You are cursed), we would appear to be inextricably linked in our apparent dislike of all things mobile phone-ish. Possibly on a `collective unconscious` level (I`ll have to Wickie Carl Jung and check that out), but fear not, for I have at my disposal a means of severing that link should it prove distasteful to You both. I should warn You, my Lord and Lady, that the `means` involves the incantation of ancient Druid chants, whilst engaged in `Tantric Levitational Sex with a partner(s) of your choice.

I for my part, I can only say, that, When My Lady AmberV, Princess of Code, abandons her lofty ethereal perch, and gets `down and dirty`; picking up the broad sword of St Jeanne d`Arc, I`m inclined t`wards replacing Posy Simmonds and Margret as my nominations for Patron Saint with just one: Her`s.

St AmberV, thats got a very very sexy ring to it.

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Sun Jul 01, 2007 11:39 am Post

It isn't the device that's evil, but the way it's used.

I work from home, and without my mobile phone many times I'd have to stay in the house, yakking on the phone about this or that thing that can't be handled by email, or enduring a conference with HQ, or rattling the cages of sub-eds in the main office 1600 miles away who imagine their social lives more important than their jobs, or fielding calls from prospective authors or would-be prospective authors. Instead, I can do these things while weeding the garden, or fishing, or hiking the back 40. It doesn't even matter what state I'm in (geographically speaking--or biologically, as far as that goes); my office is in my pocket, so to speak, and incoming calls, on my plan, are free.

But when I don't wish to be at home to callers, which is anytime I'm driving, or in a public place such as a train or a doctor's office or the cheese aisle at Fred Myers or Tesco, or anytime other than weekdays 9am to 4pm, I can turn the bloody thing off and let it gather messages, which I can return or not at my convenience, when I get someplace quiet and private and when I've got nothing more important to do, like fish or work on a book.

I'm not so keen on the iPhone, in part because AT&T doesn't serve my rural area and majorly sucks, by all reports; and in part because I've no use for all its whizz-bang features. An address book, a calendar, and a bluetooth headset are enough for me. All the rest seems technology in search of a use.