Tea Time

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Fluff
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Sat Jul 16, 2011 9:50 pm Post

Sent from Pangur ban's Astral iPad

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AmberV
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Sun Jul 17, 2011 5:27 am Post

Well, that's a pity to hear then. I guess the tea I used to get from there will have to be consigned to the realms of Proust.
.:.
Ioa Petra'ka
“Whole sight, or all the rest is desolation.” —John Fowles

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Fluff
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Sun Jul 17, 2011 11:49 am Post

Why so Mr I? As, His Crassness, vic-k, will tell you: "The lazy old fecker made everything up! All his memories were in his mind (<-play on words Mr I...but true, nonetheless), he'd have a thought today, and then regurgitate it tomorrow as a memory of events from behind the, 'Swirling Mist Curtain'. Feckin old fraud couldn't tell a madeleine, from a Crawford's cream cracker or dunking doughnut!"

Whereas your memories, Mr I, are fresh and vibrant, and as you point out, of the excellent products you recieved from http://www.specialtea.com/ Who appear to be still there in our other colony, just up the road from you.

Bonne chance, Marcel
Fluff
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ya
yadianna
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Tue Sep 03, 2019 9:16 am Post

Good to know you are a tea lover, me too, i like Chinese white tea.

Famous for its silver-colored leaves and liquid, white tea is a kind of special rarity in Chinese tea. With pekoe on its tender leaves, the boiled tea is covered with silver-colored pekoe, always looking like wearing "white clothes". White tea is slightly fermented in a degree of 10%. The two key procedures in tea-making are withering and drying, which keeps its special pekoe, fresh taste and also the natural vitamins that are beneficial to peopled health.

This is produced on a very limited scale in China (originally in Fujian Province) and Sri Lanka. The new buds are plucked before they open, are withered to allow the natural moisture to evaporate, and then dried. The curled-up buds have a silvery appearance (and are sometimes referred to as Silver Tip) and give a very pale, straw-colored liquor.

Renowned for their delicate aroma and their refreshing properties, white tea are a specialty of Fujian Province, which is divided into three main regions: Fuding, Zhenghe and Jianyang. Now, however; several estates in Darjeeling are producing white teas, and this trend seems to be spreading to other countries.

Traditionally produced from precious harvests that last only a very short time (about two weeks) in the spring, white teas were once reserved exclusively for emperors and other high-ranking officials. These teas are the most minimally processed of all.

White teas are usually divided into two types: those made only from downy buds (such as Yin Zhen and silver needles) and those made from a mixture of buds and leaves (such as Bai Mu Dan and Shou Mei).They are processed in two main stages, withering and sorting.

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Rob Kievit
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Sun Sep 22, 2019 8:30 pm Post

Good to see this topic revived!

I've been a loose-leaf tea brewer ever since 1973 when my then girlfriend bought me three tins of Jackson's of Piccadilly, being an orange tin of Orange Pekoe, a green one for Ching Wo and a blue one containing Earl Grey.

From those humble beginnings I ventured into many teas unknown. To this day, my favourites are Ceylon varieties, thank you Sri Lanka. Brewed pretty strong using water that is boiling - not merely hot - tea leaves resting and expanding in a basket which is removed from the pot after 4 minutes, you get that pungent, aromatic, hot beverage which is real tea. You simply cannot achieve the same sensory result using bags, however convenient that invention may be.

I found it easy to give up whiskey and gin, which I did about 15 years ago; I can imagine saying goodbye to beer at some point; but never will I abandon tea.

Recently I came across the ex-girlfriend. She's still a tea-drinker, too.

P.S. I advised the current mrs. K. to start munching chocolate only after the first cup of tea, otherwise the taste of the tea would be lost on her.