Grumpy old wordsmiths

Kh
Khadrelt
Posts: 361
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 1:22 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: Utah, USA
Contact:

Tue Jan 29, 2008 7:27 pm Post

My personal favorite is the term 'unthaw.'

"Go get the roast out of the freezer and unthaw it," they say. Arrrgh! I don't care if it's in the dictionary, it sounds ridiculous!
And that, my Liege, is how we know the earth to be banana-shaped.

Hu
Hugh
Posts: 2444
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:05 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: UK

Tue Jan 29, 2008 7:37 pm Post

Spotted a good double example of the Greengrocer's Apostrophe the other day, in Greenwich I think. "Apple's and Pear's". Rendered in gold leaf too.

User avatar
Juddbert
Posts: 1100
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 2:08 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: Penzance, Cornwall, UK

Tue Jan 29, 2008 7:42 pm Post

Does that translate to Stair's then Hugh?


:wink:
Can't write right. Don't care neither. Er...either.

Scrivener 3.1.5 on macOS 10.15.6
Occasional player of the old Scappleodium...

dr
druid
Posts: 1721
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2007 2:29 pm
Platform: Mac, Win + Linux
Location: Princeton NJ, USA

Tue Jan 29, 2008 8:48 pm Post

Khadrelt wrote:My personal favorite is the term 'unthaw.'

"Go get the roast out of the freezer and unthaw it," they say. Arrrgh! I don't care if it's in the dictionary, it sounds ridiculous!


It may be in dictionaries, but it's illogical. Thaw means to melt. Unthaw should therefore mean to freeze. Or refreeze something that was thawed.

Hu
Hugh
Posts: 2444
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:05 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: UK

Tue Jan 29, 2008 9:57 pm Post

Juddbert wrote:Does that translate to Stair's then Hugh?


:wink:


Blimey, Judders old fruit, too true. You're brown bread right. I must've bin Brahms 'n Liszt, yeah. Etc etc etc...

:wink:

User avatar
vic-k
Posts: 7135
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2007 8:23 am
Platform: Mac + Windows
Location: Protesting in the nude, outside ex Red Lion TESCO Store

Tue Jan 29, 2008 10:33 pm Post

I`ll tell you what gets up my nose!! Y`know those letters you get from the debt collecting `firms`(I use the word firms in its ironic sense. As in criminal gangs), the ones that say `"If y` don`t give us the money, we`ll beat you up; shit on your doorstep and smash your windows, after arranging for twenty cowboy double glazing companies to turn up all at the same time?
Well, have you noticed, they are always signed,

Kind Regards

Anjelica Sopwith.

If that`s sarcasm I think it`sick?
As a professional, you, are your one and only asset. Without integrity you are worthless, but with it, you are priceless.

User avatar
Juddbert
Posts: 1100
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 2:08 pm
Platform: Mac
Location: Penzance, Cornwall, UK

Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:53 pm Post

Hugh wrote:Blimey, Judders old fruit, too true. You're brown bread right. I must've bin Brahms 'n Liszt, yeah. Etc etc etc...

:wink:



Gor blimey Guv'nor. Y'gott yer 'postrophes just abaart right. Grammar school kids... y'can always tell!


:wink:
Can't write right. Don't care neither. Er...either.

Scrivener 3.1.5 on macOS 10.15.6
Occasional player of the old Scappleodium...

St
Studio717
Posts: 376
Joined: Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:27 pm
Location: California

Wed Jan 30, 2008 1:50 am Post

This thread made me smile. Last night I was bemoaning yet another instance of those-who-should-know-better using the word "loathe" when they mean "loath." A minor quibble - sort of - but I have given up on it's/its, the variations of 'there/their/and they're', and so on, and I need something to bemoan.

(Never mind that I was 35 and a published novelist before I discovered that discrete and discreet were separate words. For years, I thought discrete was a misspelling of discreet, and since I knew how it was spelled, I never bothered to look it up. :oops: )

Which leads me to a loud 'huzzah!' for the new Cambridge Grammar (circa 2002) which shows just how alive language can be. No one will be wrong forever. :lol:

Ma
Margaret
Posts: 72
Joined: Fri Sep 01, 2006 3:52 am
Location: Southern Oregon

Wed Jan 30, 2008 2:54 am Post

Myself.

Jane gave a bonus to Bob and myself.
Bob bought books for everyone but myself.

Myself is used incorrectly so often, it's only a matter of time before its misuse becomes acceptable. I can't stand it!

Margaret

User avatar
Mollys Mum
Posts: 369
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 1:38 am

Wed Jan 30, 2008 8:45 pm Post

[i]Between you and I.[/i]

Drives ME round the bend.

User avatar
popcornflix
Posts: 353
Joined: Tue Feb 13, 2007 8:18 pm
Location: Row 15 Seat 107

Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:08 pm Post

I am annoyed by people who write that "the team will loose the game."

You LOOSE the dogs of war.
Your sister can be LOOSE.

When I read that misspelling, I LOSE my patience.
.:popcornFlix:.

Ma
Matthew Graybosch
Posts: 79
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:29 pm
Location: New York

Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:32 pm Post

popcornflix wrote:When I read that misspelling, I LOSE my patience.


I get snarly when people say or write "You need to...", instead of "Would you please...". First of all, it's rude. Second, the gap between what I need and what somebody else wants from me is usually so wide that Evel Knievel could have earned a billion dollars for trying to jump it.

User avatar
Sean Coffee
Posts: 509
Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 7:10 pm

Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:45 pm Post

I keep thinking of fresh annoyances.

First, given the mix of Brits and Americans in the forum, I suppose we should keep pronunciation out of the mix. I'm sure your average Englishman does a good deal of cringing when she* sees what we've done to the language here in the States. Throw a Canadian and an Irishman (and a Scot, and whoever the hell else I forgot) into the mix, and it might just spark an all out grammar brawl. That said, when did the word integral become in-TEG-ral? Maybe it's me. Sorry, that bugs the shit out of me.

On to my main point: the "Between you and I" and various "myself" constructions mentioned above are, far as I can tell, attempts at highfalutin speech by folks who don't always (but should) know better. This phenomenon gets worse when a "new" 50-cent word enters the mass lexicon, and people repeat it exactly the way they heard it first until it becomes an annoying cliche.

A few years back, it was "plethora", ALWAYS paired with "veritable." If I hear one more linguistically impaired sportscaster tell me that a team has a "veritable plethora" of talent, I'm going to... y'know, complain loudly in a forum. Because those are once-strong words that now mean nothing.

"Oxymoron"... Jesus, who let that out of the bottle? I can happily die never hearing another co-worker** say: "Military Intelligence? That's an oxymoron! (Guffaw!)" Yeah, dude. I know. Because EVERYONE KNOWS!

Alright, sorry. I'm done.

Oh, wait, question: How do people (I'm looking at you, sign on the pharmacy across the street!) get 'till out of the one-elled until? When you're paying per letter for a sign, why would you create an abbreviation that has the same number of letters as the word you're abbreviating (unless apostrophes are free, but still! There's only one L!).

Which brings up another signage peeve: injudicious quotation marks. In my mind, when a sign says WE HAVE "THE BEST" RIBS IN THE CITY, that means that that have shitty ribs and are being sarcastic, right? FEATURING "GREAT SERVICE" FOR ALL OUR CUSTOMERS. Killin' me.

Anyway.




*See what I did there? I'm proud.

**Truth is, I'm a freelance writer and thus have no co-workers, but I used to, and they said it a lot.

ti
tim
Posts: 335
Joined: Wed Dec 20, 2006 8:57 pm
Location: Toronto
Contact:

Thu Jan 31, 2008 3:15 am Post

Till until?

From the website of language maven, Michael Quinion: The common belief is that till is a shortened form of until, but the truth of the matter is that till is by far the older word, being recorded from about the year 800, while it took another 400 years for until to appear in the language (it’s a compound of till with the archaic Old Norse und, as far as, which also survives in the archaic unto). The word ’til, has been created within the past century by people who believe that till is an abbreviation of until.

Now as to those quotation marks... I was once working with a business executive who wanted to write a letter to his staff about how important it was to pay "rigorous" attention to such and such. I told him to lose the quotation marks, but he insisted, saying he wanted to emphasize the word. I asked him if he would ever consider registering at a hotel as Mr. Smith and "wife". He got the point and dropped the quotes.

All the best,

Tim
In theory, there's no difference
between theory and practice.
In practice, there is.

Yogi Berra

da
dafu
Posts: 564
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2007 1:33 am
Platform: Mac
Location: Chicago
Contact:

Thu Jan 31, 2008 4:25 am Post

Complement and compliment?

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHH!!!


Dave