Scapple User Guide - Proof-Readers Welcome!

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KB
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Thu Mar 28, 2013 12:51 pm Post

Hello beta-testers,

I have uploaded a version of the Scapple User Guide here:

http://www.literatureandlatte.com/dlbet ... rGuide.pdf

There are a few sections that need filling out (the inspector, styles, preferences and import/export), but it is mostly finished, so if anyone wants to take a look through, we'd be very grateful.

I've also uploaded an updated, 2-page QuickStart Guide which will get new users up and running quickly:

http://www.literatureandlatte.com/dlbet ... tGuide.pdf

Thanks!

All the best,
Keith
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Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:05 pm Post

(1) Very minor: in section B.7. of the SUG you have both "minimize" and "minimised" — one with Z and the other with S.

(2) Page 61:
Accesses the standard Mac OS X spell check and grammar system (for supported langauges).

… typo for languages.

(3) Page 64
On Right (Cltrl-  RightArrow)

… should be Ctrl

(4) Various pages - a mix of er/re spelling in centre and center.

(5) Similar to (4) with color and colour … maybe these are intentional?

(6) Page 70 "dropshadow" — this is, I believe, usually two words or hyphenated. drop shadow or drop-shadow.

(7) Appendix C "Acknowlegements" — should be Acknowledgements. Same in ToC, but I assume this is automatically generated.

(8) Page 43
To apply or remove boldface on a note, do one of the folllowing:

Too many Ls in following.

(9) Page 40
Figure 6.3: A scapple board using a leather background texture (no digital sheep were harmed).

… small s for scapple. Elsewhere, you've used a capital S.

(10) Page 42
All style changes can be made using the The Inspector (chapter 8),

… two x "the".

(11) Page 45
The default text colour is used by notes that don’t have a specific text colour set; or, to put it another way, when you apply a text colour to individual notes, as described below, that overrides the the default text colour.

… two x "the".

(12) Page 50
When the text you are searching for is located offscreen, Scapple will automatically scroll the board so that the match is displayed.

… "offscreen" is usually hyphenated when used as either an adjective or an adverb—according to the OED: off-screen.

(13) Page 4
The concept is straightforward: when I’m in the early, planning stages of a project…

The comma between early and planning is not needed. Personally—to reduce the "I" count from 3 to 2 in that sentence—I'd go for:
The concept is straightforward: early in the planning stages of a project…


(14) Page 9
If all else fails, try quitting and re-launching Scapple and try again.

Relaunching doesn't need a hyphen (OED). Could also get rid of the two uses of try in one sentence:
If all else fails, try quitting and relaunching Scapple.
If all else fails, quit and relaunch Scapple and try again.
If all else fails, quit and relaunch Scapple.

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Sat Mar 30, 2013 5:46 am Post

Thanks Mac!

The mixed spelling is a result of the user interface being U.S. English and the documentation being U.K. English. So where the manual must address UI components verbatim (like menu titles), it uses U.S. spelling.

I think the the-the inspector one was fixed already, but I fixed the other one. :)

I've uploaded a new version of the PDF that contains all of the missing sections listed above, including the revisions you've posted.

It is now time for beer and a weekend, and I'm going to sit down with this thing on my iPad and proof-read it all the way through. That's one nice thing about a short manual. Proof-reading the whole Scrivener manual is like curling up with a big thick fantasy novel.
.:.
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Sat Mar 30, 2013 7:00 am Post

Mac wrote:(13) Page 4
The concept is straightforward: when I’m in the early, planning stages of a project…

The comma between early and planning is not needed. Personally—to reduce the "I" count from 3 to 2 in that sentence—I'd go for:
The concept is straightforward: early in the planning stages of a project…

Just to stir things a bit ...

Without looking at what follows, I would contend that the presence of the comma makes for a different interpretation:

With the comma, to me, the "early" and "planning" are two separate modifiers of "stages", so that the "early" implies that planning is one of the early stages of the project;

Without the comma, "early" modifes "planning stages", so you get your rewritten interpretation.

Having just downloaded the Guide, I see: (a) that what follows "project" is an em-dash, so that doesn't help with deciding; (b) Ioa has apparently removed the comma in question. On the presumption that the original text was written by Keith, perhaps he will weigh in here and state which of the two inferences he intended to be drawn.

:twisted:

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Sat Mar 30, 2013 8:20 am Post

On page 4
As an unreconstructed Brit, I loathe the use of "... off of ..."

... I tend to take a piece of A3 paper and just write my thoughts and ideas all over it, in no particular order, making notes off of one idea and drawing lines and arrows between them ...

On page 23
The “Connect With Arrow” command will only make arrow connections from the first note selected to subsequently-connected arrows; it will not make arrow connections between every single note.


Surely, it should be "subsequently-connected notes"?

On page 25
I also loathe "... inside of ...", when "inside" is a perfectly good preposition, not needing a preposition/particle following it.

If you need to select all of the notes (and potentially shapes within shapes), inside of a
shape:

and there shouldn't be a comma following "... shapes)"

Idem on page 82
When working with notes inside of Scapple, all of the notes in the selection will be acted upon.


Time to stop procrastinating!

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Sat Mar 30, 2013 9:02 am Post

I think my mother would have hit me if I had dared to say "off of". I'm old-fashioned, and I like elegance, and "off of" sounds horribly inelegant to me. "From" is so much better.

Just another view from the side of the Atlantic where they speak English :wink:

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Sat Mar 30, 2013 9:55 am Post

xiamenese wrote:With the comma, to me, the "early" and "planning" are two separate modifiers of "stages", so that the "early" implies that planning is one of the early stages of the project;


Hi Mark

The comma essentially replaces "and", which would mean the sentence would read...

The concept is straightforward: when I’m in the early and planning stages of a project...

That would imply that the early stages of the project come before the planning stages of the project, which, I think, would not be accurate. If that was the case, then the sentence would be...

The concept is straightforward: when I’m in the planning and early stages of a project… i.e the planning comes before the early stages.

I am pretty sure that the intention is for "early" to modify the "planning stages" ... though I guess only the author knows what they meant.

That was my thinking ...

Happy or have helped, Ioa.

Hope you all have a great weekend.

Mac

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Sat Mar 30, 2013 10:20 am Post

Mac wrote:
xiamenese wrote:With the comma, to me, the "early" and "planning" are two separate modifiers of "stages", so that the "early" implies that planning is one of the early stages of the project;


Hi Mark

The comma essentially replaces "and", which would mean the sentence would read...

The concept is straightforward: when I’m in the early and planning stages of a project...

That would imply that the early stages of the project come before the planning stages of the project, which, I think, would not be accurate. If that was the case, then the sentence would be...


But that is not how I read it, where the comma is more like "or", giving: when I'm in the early, i.e. planning stages of a project, which I think is different from the "early planning stages" as opposed to the "later planning stages" of a project.

But as I also said, the original author should decide.

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Sat Mar 30, 2013 10:29 am Post

With the comma, both "early" and "planning" modify "stages"; it doesn't necessitate them being exclusive: consider that "early, grey hours of the day" does not indicate two separate sets of hours, early ones that come before grey ones, but "early grey hours of the day" suggests that there are later hours also grey. Thus, the early stage of the project may be the planning stage. Arguably you could remove the commas and place "planning" in brackets: "When I'm in the early (planning) stages". That would demote the importance of planning in the sentence, though, which wouldn't serve Scapple very well. :)

Regarding extraneous prepositions: I think Keith wrote this whole section, so I'll thank you to stop blaming Americans. ;)
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Sat Mar 30, 2013 11:20 am Post

Eek, the "off of" slip is indeed mine - clearly some colloquial American has slipped into my vocabulary. I would have deleted it on the second draft, though (I hope I would, anyway), as I agree with Mark that "off of" should never be suffered. :) The reliable R.L. Trask says:

Though it is common in vernacular speech, especially in the USA, the preposition off of is not acceptable in standard English.


Trasky is always right.

All of those "inside of"s have nothing to do with me, though - those are Ioa's and I won't take the blame for them!

As for the comma--and I haven't even worked out whether Jennifer is defending its retention or championing its ousting--I stand by my original usage and think it should remain. Both "early" and "planning" are modifiers of "stages" and thus should be separated by a comma as they essentially form a list of modifiers. Moreover, that comma is there in my head as I read the sentence to myself - there is a slight pause between "early" and "planning" to show that "planning" is inserted as an extra modifier to "stages" to clarify what those early stages are.
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Sat Mar 30, 2013 11:42 am Post

Hi Keith

Author's prerogative, of course.

What comes first for you?

The planning stages of projects?

The early stages of projects?

Just curious ...

I believe Jennifer has erred, but don't have time now to explain. Will try to make time next week.

Mac

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Sat Mar 30, 2013 12:03 pm Post

Neither, they are simultaneous - the planning stages *are* the early stages. Thus: "early, planning" not "early planning". :) To put it another way, "early" and "planning" are coordinate adjectives in this case, not cumulative ones. It's not some planning stages that are early, but stages that are both early and for planning (you could equally write "the early, thinking and planning stages"). That is my intended meaning, anyway, which makes the comma correct; if you interpret it as there being many planning stages and Scapple as being intended for the earlier of those planning stages, then "early planning stages" would indeed be correct. But as this was not my meaning, the comma should remain.

Heh, at this rate we'll never get to page 2. :)
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Sat Mar 30, 2013 12:33 pm Post

MimeticMouton wrote:With the comma, both "early" and "planning" modify "stages"; it doesn't necessitate them being exclusive: consider that "early, grey hours of the day" does not indicate two separate sets of hours, early ones that come before grey ones, but "early grey hours of the day" suggests that there are later hours also grey. Thus, the early stage of the project may be the planning stage. Arguably you could remove the commas and place "planning" in brackets: "When I'm in the early (planning) stages". That would demote the importance of planning in the sentence, though, which wouldn't serve Scapple very well. :)

Regarding extraneous prepositions: I think Keith wrote this whole section, so I'll thank you to stop blaming Americans. ;)

Jennifer, thank you; "or" is not exclusive in your sense. So, I'm happy to have you agreeing with me, it seemes Keith does too, hearing that pause. But Jennifer, please note, I did not blame Americans for anything, I merely pointed out my unreconstructed Britishness and loathing for those usages. I wouldn't be surprised if there are other varieties of English that also use "off of" and "inside of", which make me feel like an oyster that has just had lemon-juice squeezed on it!

:)

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Sat Mar 30, 2013 12:52 pm Post

KB wrote:Neither, they are simultaneous - the planning stages *are* the early stages. Thus: "early, planning" not "early planning". :)


If, as you say, the planning stages *are* the early stages, then the comma is not needed.

The early morning sunshine. Not... the early, morning sunshine.
The early day motion. Not... the early, day motion.
Early French architecture. Not... early, French architecture.
An early hour of the day. Not... an early, hour of the day.

The comma essentially replaces the word 'and'. If it was used, sentences would read...
The early and morning sunshine.
The early and day motion.
The early and French architecture.
An early and hour of the day.

But if you mean...
In the early and planning stages, then the comma is fine.
In the early, planning stages.
Although, if the planning stages of a project come before the early stages of a project (most people plan a project first and then enter the early stages of the project itself), then a sequential use would probably be prudent...
In the planning and early stages of projects.
In the planning, early stages of projects.

But if, as you say, the planning stages *are* the early stages, then the comma really is not needed... Though any author can do as they wish.

Bestest

Mac ... Other opinions are available ;)

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Sat Mar 30, 2013 1:10 pm Post

Mac wrote:If, as you say, the planning stages *are* the early stages, then the comma is not needed.


No, quite the opposite. By being both planning and early stages, as you note yourself later in your reply, the comma is correct. Had I said that I was talking about an early period in the planning stages--that these particular planning stages come early--then you'd be right, but I didn't. I said that the planning stages are *also* the early stages, and thus these stages are *both* early *and* planning stages - thus, "early, planning stages". So, I'm not "doing as I wish" but using the correct construction in this case. :)

In the examples you give, it's the "morning sunshine" that is early (because there is other morning sunshine later), not the "sunshine" on its own; the "day motion" that is early; the "French architecture" which is early, not the "architecture"; the "hour of the day" which is early (because there are many hours of the day), not the day itself. In none of those examples are the two adjectives both being applied to the noun; the first adjective instead modifies the second. It's not French architecture *and* early architecture; it's very specifically early French architecture. It's not early sunshine that also happens to be morning sunshine - it is very specifically early morning sunshine. That's because all of those examples are of cumulative adjectives, but as I explained, "early" and "planning" are co-ordinate in this case, not cumulative.

As a counter example, consider "younger uneducated vampires" vs "younger, uneducated vampires". The former suggests there are many uneducated vampires but we are specifically talking about the younger ones of that group; the latter suggests it is the younger vampires that are generally also the uneducated ones. Likewise, "early, planning stages" tells us that these stages are both early and planning stages - they are the same stage, just as the younger vampires are the same as the uneducated ones. (Note that I use this merely as an example and do not mean to suggest that younger vampires truly are more uneducated.)
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