.scrivx file truncated

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Three Blind Lice
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Platform: Windows

Sun Oct 29, 2017 5:07 am Post

kewms wrote:And if the power drops while the temporary file is being written?

Then there's still the original file.

Design#1: Program auto-saves every 5 minutes. If the power drops, the most you lose is the past five minutes. On restart, the program will tell you there was a problem. Either the original or the auto-save will be available. The most you lose is five minutes of your work.

Design#2: Program will only do a backup upon exit. If the power drops in the wrong moment, you might lose the entire session as files are overwritten directly. File will be corrupted and crash the application upon launch - but you will only find out when you actually launch the file, as the application won't automatically tell you. To rescue the project and "only" lose a day's work (or more if you don't typically shut down your machine over night), you will have to poke around in a folder that may or may not be on the computer you're actually working on (worst case you just left for a working holiday and when you try to boot up you discover that the working copy is corrupted and the backup is on your home computer).

Which one would you choose?

kewms wrote:Consider the case of a novel reader who says, "I just didn't find the protagonist believable." Now, as the author, fix the character. Good luck.

I'm afraid that's just not a valid comparison. What I call a "design flaw" in this case is not about errors (which may or may not be due to issues that neither the programmer nor the user can control - like power outages), but how those errors are handled to minimize the negative effects. Totally different ballgame, and I don't see how there would be an analogy in writing or character development.

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lunk
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Platform: Mac + iOS
Location: Sweden 64° N

Sun Oct 29, 2017 7:44 am Post

Scrivener by default autosaves any changes every time you stop writing for a few seconds and makes a complete backup of the whole project when you close the project.
An incomplete .scrivx file suggests that the closing of the project was interrupted. If it had happened to me I would try to establish in what way this could happen and if I wanted support or other users to help in the process, I would try to describe the exact way I acted from the point of starting the shut down process to removing the SSD card.

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Three Blind Lice
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Platform: Windows

Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:31 am Post

lunk wrote:Scrivener by default autosaves any changes every time you stop writing for a few seconds and makes a complete backup of the whole project when you close the project.
An incomplete .scrivx file suggests that the closing of the project was interrupted. If it had happened to me I would try to establish in what way this could happen and if I wanted support or other users to help in the process, I would try to describe the exact way I acted from the point of starting the shut down process to removing the SSD card.

We are moving in circles again:

- An incomplete .scrivx file not only suggests that the closing of the project was interrupted, but also that Scrivener couldn't handle that interruption. There are a number of possible reasons for interruptions, many of which the user has zero control over (crash, power outage, etc.), which is why a program handling crucial data should always be designed to keep the damage to a minimum. That isn't hard to do, and I have described above how it can be implemented (and how in fact it is implemented in many other programs).

- As I have already stated above, it is impossible to figure out what may or may have happened two weeks after the incident. That, again, is due to the fact that Scrivener won't tell you something went wrong unless you open the actual project (unlike similar programs).

I am unsubscribing from this thread now, as I have already reiterated multiple times what I wanted to say. Thanks for the replies.

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kewms
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Platform: Mac

Sun Oct 29, 2017 6:32 pm Post

Three Blind Lice wrote:Then there's still the original file.

Design#1: Program auto-saves every 5 minutes. If the power drops, the most you lose is the past five minutes. On restart, the program will tell you there was a problem. Either the original or the auto-save will be available. The most you lose is five minutes of your work.


Scrivener saves whenever you're idle for more than a few seconds. (Interval specified in the Scrivener -> Preferences -> General pane.) "Saving" and "making a backup" are completely different tasks.

Design#2: Program will only do a backup upon exit. If the power drops in the wrong moment, you might lose the entire session as files are overwritten directly. File will be corrupted and crash the application upon launch - but you will only find out when you actually launch the file, as the application won't automatically tell you. To rescue the project and "only" lose a day's work (or more if you don't typically shut down your machine over night), you will have to poke around in a folder that may or may not be on the computer you're actually working on (worst case you just left for a working holiday and when you try to boot up you discover that the working copy is corrupted and the backup is on your home computer).


As noted, the "backup" is a completely separate copy of the project from the live version that is saved as you work. The backup is only taken when you close the program for performance reasons, although the File -> Backup -> Backup Now command will create one at any time. Best practice is to shut down your machine overnight for exactly this reason, among others.

I'm afraid that's just not a valid comparison. What I call a "design flaw" in this case is not about errors (which may or may not be due to issues that neither the programmer nor the user can control - like power outages), but how those errors are handled to minimize the negative effects. Totally different ballgame, and I don't see how there would be an analogy in writing or character development.


Without knowing what the error even *is*, it's very difficult to ensure that it is handled appropriately.

Katherine
Scrivener Support Team

 

 

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